The pMD Blog

Welcome to the
pMD Blog...

where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.


Image: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  A new technique called "genome cloaking" allows researchers to access specific gene mutations while still keeping the patient's private genetic information protected. Researchers from Stanford University developed this method, which uses cryptography to hide genetic information, to protect patients' privacy while doctors perform genetic analyses.  Read More

•  While wearables remain a popular tech purchase, actual ongoing user engagement and evidence proving the health benefits still continues to be a challenge. Researchers are still trying to find ways to integrate wearables into health care, specifically with patient care.  Read More

•  Johnson & Johnson paid $417 million in damages to Eva Echeverria of East Lost Angeles, who developed ovarian cancer after using the company's baby powder product for decades. Numerous studies have linked talcum powder use with ovarian cancer but the findings have not been consistent. This may be the largest award so far among lawsuits tying ovarian cancer to talcum powder.  Read More

•  Didn't heed the protective eye-cover warnings during Monday's Great American Eclipse? Chances are, your quick glances may not have caused permanent, long-term damage to your eyes. However, it takes at least 12 hours before knowing if anything has happened. If your vision seems blurry or you're seeing spots, make an appointment with your optometrist to further assess any damage to your eyes.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

At pMD, the role of an Account Executive (AE) is very exciting! If you’ve kept up with our blog, or have interacted with our team members, you know that travel is essential to our company. We are rarely ever confined to a cubicle. Often, you can find our team scattered across the U.S. and at times attending several meetings in different cities and different time zones within a 24-hour period! While a lot of this travel is focused on our current customers, there is a large need for us to travel to prospective customers as well.

pMD AEs take a different approach to sales. We spend a great deal of time understanding the prospective customer’s current workflow and assessing whether any one of our suite of products would be a good fit for them. At pMD, you learn to ask a lot of questions and the logic behind that is intentional. Our product is by no means one-size-fits-all and is all very customizable. For example, a cardiology group in Southern California may use our Charge Capture product very differently than another cardiology group in Northern California. So, asking a multitude of questions is imperative to learning more about your potential customer and how pMD can be customized for them.

Since 1998, our team has prioritized travel and has witnessed the positive impact first-hand. A solid face-to-face meeting is invaluable when comparing to a 30-minute phone conversation. I’ve personally experienced the benefits of in-person meetings and can attest that traveling to prospective customers helps to build trust, inspire positive conversations, and ultimately build strong(er) relationships. While you’re on the road, it’s important that you’re maximizing that face-to-face time.

Traveling should never feel like a burden. At times, it can be exhausting and time-consuming but only if you allow it to be. Here are some helpful tips and tricks to make your future travel escapades more comfortable, more efficient, and ultimately more rewarding!


I’ve personally found that these tips promote a more efficient way to travel, which saves you time and keeps you sane! What can you do with more time? It provides you the opportunity to visit more prospective customers and spend quality time listening to their needs. If you build a relationship and develop trust with prospective customers early on, they will ideally become happy, new customers! Happy, new customers translate to a happy pMD team! If you have any questions or would like to find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, and care coordination software and services, please contact pMD.

Image: Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Drug prices for multiple sclerosis continue to soar as pharmaceutical companies compete with one another for higher prices. In response, House Democrats have started an in-depth investigation, which includes the probing of 7 major drugmakers' pricing strategies.  Read More

•  Want to learn a new language but having difficulty retaining what you've learned? Try hopping on a workout bike or walking on a treadmill while memorizing vocabulary. Researchers have found that working out during language instruction increases your ability to memorize, retain and understand new vocabulary.  Read More

•  A new Executive Order, called "Strengthening the Cybersecurity of Federal Networks and Critical Infrastructure," requires federal agencies to report on and outline mitigation strategies for cyber risks. The deadline for the required reporting is this month. Some agencies anticipate falling behind due to unexpected budget requirements to meet the EO deadline.  Read More

•  Each year, more than 600,000 babies die of blood infections. Scientists have discovered an inexpensive treatment to prevent newborn sepsis. The secret weapon? Probiotic bacteria commonly found in foods like kimchi, pickles and other fermented vegetables.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.
Earlier this month on August 1st, Apple released their highly anticipated third quarter earnings. In the report, Apple boasted its third straight quarter of year-over-year accelerated growth in revenue and beat analyst predictions of earnings per share. Apple was on a roll, having sold 41 million iPhones during the quarter and driving Apple’s Services division to a record high.

pMD’s users, which include physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and support staff, tend to heavily favor Apple devices. While there is usually a noticeable fluctuation among our iOS and Android device breakdown from quarter to quarter, usage among our customers’ Android and iOS devices this quarter remain unchanged from the last. Stagnant? Perhaps. Compelling? Absolutely. With a plethora of new Android devices released last quarter, that may have been enough to entice pMD Android users from slipping away to the competition's territory. Correspondingly, Apple loyalists stood firm. Are they possibly awaiting the highly anticipated release of the iPhone 8?

iOS vs. Android:



Looking at the breakdown of pMD’s iPhone usage by model, 7.2% of users upgraded their devices to the iPhone 7 / 7 Plus and iPhone 6S owners grew by a slim 1% margin. The iPhone 6 saw a decrease in overall users, so we can infer that users likely updated to the 6S or 7 models. Users are slowly saying goodbye to older models of the iPhone and saying hello to the new, sleeker models.


iPhone By Model:



It's a positive outlook for Apple next quarter. With the release of the iPhone 8 coming this fall, we can bet that Tim Cook's Q4 earnings announcement will be nothing short of enthusiastic.

Image: Eugenia Sanz

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  A recent observational study in Obstetrics & Gynecology suggested that women who suffer from sleep problems have a higher risk of giving birth prematurely than women without sleep disorders. Women with insomnia had a 30 percent increased risk and those with sleep apnea had a 40 percent increased risk of preterm birth.  Read More

•  The president declared Thursday that the opioid crisis is indeed a national emergency. States and federal agencies will be provided with more resources and power to combat the epidemic, according the President.  Read More

•  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Maradol papayas imported from Mexico should be avoided by U.S. consumers. Salmonella has been linked to the papayas and has sickened over 100 people nationwide. Symptoms typically appear 12-72 hours after exposure and can include diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps.  Read More

•  Are health care organizations prepared for the inevitable Ransomware 2.0 attacks? The next wave of attacks will likely target medical devices and Internet of Things, which historically lack sufficient protections against malware. Compliance experts recommend a tight coupling of information technology, information security, and biomedical personnel to ensure medical devices are part of any incident response plan.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

"Agile", "Java", "Big data", "SaaS" - buzz words found in practically all programmer resumes these days. At pMD, we get hundreds of resumes a week, but only a handful of positions to fill. With all these buzz words and degrees, every engineer applicant starts to blend together and seemingly appear no better or worse than the one before. How can one engineer stand out from the crowd? What do we look for in a pMD developer?

I'm pretty fortunate to be a part of pMD's development team. Ever growing and evolving, one obvious common factor stands out. Sure, everyone's sharp, likes to think outside of the box, etc... but a common trait amongst the entire team is everyone's drive to DO and own something. It's a strange trait to think about, but to me, it's what allows us to consistently create great products and meet the continuous demands of our customers. This trait I'm talking about doesn't simply refer to just having initiative. In some ways it's simpler, and in other ways, it’s multi-faceted. Whether it’s working on a complicated product enhancement, a simple interface project, or something as small as a one line bug fix, every single developer jumps on each "challenge" as soon as they step into the office - not because we have to, but because we WANT to.

These expectations translate into a candidate who enjoys talking about a particular project. Show us your direction, your focus, what you like about projects you’ve worked on, and what you want to work on in the future rather than simply discussing skills and awards. The basic coding tests will be there. To stand out from the rest, just be yourself rather than reciting your skill set. Every company will always say "we want the best of the best", but the truth of it all is, we're really just looking for someone who wants to get the job done with us, someone who is reliable, and someone who is ready to enjoy a rewarding beverage together after a long day of coding. Cheers!

Visit our careers page if you're interested in joining the pMD team! For additional information about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, and care coordination software and services, please contact pMD.

Image: Stuart Bradford

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized a 90-day reporting rule for meaningful use of electronic health records. Going into effect October 1, 2017, CMS will allow a 90-day reporting period, which previously was a one-year requirement.  Read More

•  Applying "design thinking" to hospitals, in which the innovations come from employees working in the field as opposed to administrators, helps designers tackle many challenges with fresh solutions, saving both dollars and lives. Design thinking is useful for when a service, for example, is fundamentally broken. It allows for creative problem solving and is paramount to the improvement of patient care.  Read More

•  According to a study published on Wednesday, a team of scientists successfully edited genes in human embryos to repair a common and serious disease-causing mutation. For the first time, scientists were able to produce apparently healthy embryos as a result of this gene-editing technique.  Read More

•  Jerome Adams, M.D. has been confirmed as surgeon general by a Senate committee. Adams, alongside four others who have been confirmed for positions within the Department of Health and Human Services, will now go before the full Senate for confirmation. If confirmed by the full senate, Dr. Adams will replace recently dismissed Vivek Murthy.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

For years, I’ve traveled around the country, working with health care practices and organizations to improve internal processes and patient outcomes. After a recent trip to Alaska, I was pleasantly surprised that 8+ hours of travel to the “Last Frontier” allowed me to witness organizations blazing trails that left a lasting impact on how I view health care.

As the cost of health care continues to trend higher to unsustainable rates and patients are questioning if they’re actually even receiving better outcomes, there’s one state in particular that is consistently forced to acknowledge all of the above: Alaska - the state with the nation’s highest medical costs.

As I’ve been involved in working with medical software over the last 15 years, I admit that I have often gotten myopic in scope as it pertains to patients and health care. It’s become easy for me to narrow my focus on helping leverage communication, tools, and software that immediately help caretakers to get that patient well and on their way to a smooth recovery. For example, patient presents, issue is diagnosed and acutely treated, patient is released from the hospital, and hopefully on their way to recovery and healthier living.

My recent trip to Alaska had been eye-opening and shifted my paradigm on what drives the costs of health care so high. I came to find that truly owning the relationship with the patient drives better overall patient outcomes. Fragmentation of patient information and poor communication amongst providers is a key driver to higher health care costs and a serious challenge when trying to deliver positive patient outcomes. This is especially challenging in a state where it can take 14 hours to transfer a patient from one hospital to the next. At pMD, we are fortunate enough to partner with several, very innovative and patient-centric organizations in the Anchorage community that are making a significant impact.

While I was in Alaska, I heard one physician mention, “What’s most important in this day and age is that someone knows you as a patient. It’s not enough to just have data computerized in a system.”  These organizations that we’ve partnered with are leveraging software, processes, and care teams to coordinate efforts of communication and treatment across the entire patient’s pendulum of care. Social workers, nurses, and care coordinators help closely stay in touch with that patient in an effort to avoid re-admissions. They assist with follow-up appointments, navigate prescription refills, and answer general patient questions. They serve as the central hub, helping to coordinate care amongst PCPs, specialists, and the hospitals. In turn, by being proactive in this communication, they’re often able to prevent patients from returning back to the ER and hospitals.

For me, it was a light bulb moment in understanding that the best way to drive better patient outcomes, lower readmission rates, and reduce the costs of health care is to have a care team coordinate the care of at-risk patients even while they are not actively in the hospital. I’m sure we have all had that experience, amongst ourselves or a family member, leaving the hospital and feeling grossly unprepared to navigate the on-going medicines, therapies, and unforeseen symptoms that may arise after leaving. To be able to witness this coordination of care first-hand in Anchorage was easily one of my favorite and memorable customer site visits in over seven years at pMD.

As a company and partner, we are thrilled to play a part in providing software tools that link the community of Anchorage together. In turn, that community is able to organize, coordinate, and securely communicate amongst care teams and their patients to save lives and lower the cost of health care. We hope to be a partner with many other communities around the country, providing intuitive, coordinated technology that improves patient outcomes. For additional information about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, and care coordination software and services, please contact pMD.

Image: Fierce Healthcare

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  On Thursday night, Republican Senators failed to pass the "skinny" bill, which would have said goodbye to ACA's "individual mandate." The mandate required that nearly every American have insurance or pay a penalty and was one of Obamacare's least popular provisions. Insurers, doctors, consumer advocates, and health policy experts agreed that this repeal would have wrecked the individual market.  Read More

•  Amidst the rumors that Apple is in talks with health care organizations to explore the realm of health records, reports that Amazon is considering developing an EHR platform are stirring. Amazon has reportedly started a secret lab in Seattle, its headquarters, and has a crew working on health care applications for Amazon devices.  Read More

•  How up-to-date are you on health care news? Take this fun, online quiz by The New York Times to find out!  Read More

•  While there has been significant progress in research surrounding sports-related head injuries, there is little data on women as most research participants tend to be male athletes.  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently began to require scientists to include female animals in brain injury studies.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Takao Someya/University of Tokyo

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is working on new strategies to enroll more children in longitudinal studies that are part of their precision medicine cohort program. The All of Us Research Program aims to conduct genomic research and responsibly engage children in the decades-long studies.  Read More

•  This week, the GOP's repeal-and-delay measure lacked the votes to move forward after three Republican senators opposed the plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell could only afford to lose two votes on this bill. The White House said in a statement on Tuesday that it would back whichever strategy results in repealing the ACA.  Read More

•  Scientists have developed a new, wearable sensor that can monitor your body's activities. The sensor is lightweight, thin and flexible. It resembles that of a henna tattoo and can monitor vital signs over a long period of time. Researchers hope that it can monitor a patient's vital signs without any discomfort.  Read More

•  With financial incentives and penalizations in place to reduce hospital readmissions, the readmission rate declined 20 percent since its inception in 2012 under the Affordable Care Act.  Such a decline led some researchers to be concerned about unintended consequences, such as more deaths as patients are kept out of the hospital. In a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, no evidence was found that the reduction in hospital readmissions resulted in more deaths.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.