The pMD Blog

Welcome to the
pMD Blog...

where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.


Image: Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  In a recent report, it has been found that women taking probiotics and fish oil supplements during pregnancy and breast-feeding may reduce food allergy risks and eczema in early childhood.  Read More

•  The U.S. still has the highest health care costs in the world and some experts suggest that carefully scrutinizing unnecessary elective treatments could contribute to a long-term solution. As people live longer, the population takes on more cost.  Read More

•  On Tuesday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that it has plans to do a complete overhaul of the Meaningful Use program for hospitals. CMS Administrator, Seema Verma, specified to reporters that the agency is moving away from giving credit to providers for simply having an EHR to making sure their EHR is focused on interoperability and providing patients with their data.  Read More

•  A slowly growing number of health systems are encouraging selected emergency department patients who are acutely ill yet stable to opt for hospital-level care at home. For this subset of patients, a trip to the hospital can put them at risk for infection, sleeplessness, and delirium, among other problems. The biggest obstacle is getting health insurers to pay for it.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Getty/udra

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  According to new research published in Family Medicine, family providers are spending more time completing electronic health record (EHR) work than looking at patients during visits. While technology can provide automation and efficiency that many hospitals find appealing, the downfall is that they can also steal providers' face-to-face time away from patients.  Read More

•  When you feel that tickle rising into your nose or throat, your first instinct may be to suppress a sneeze or cough by covering your mouth with your hand. While your efforts to stop the spread of germs are valiant, covering your mouth using your hand might actually be just as risky as sneezing out into the open air. Unless you plan to wash your hand immediately after sneezing into it, you're likely still spreading germs through everything you touch thereafter. Sneeze into your sleeve and stop those germs from spreading!  Read More

•  Apple plans to launch a medical practice this spring, called AC Wellness. The hope is to test potential consumer-facing health services and products with Apple employees first. There will also be two primary care clinics for Apple employees in Santa Clara County. This news comes shortly after Amazon's announcement that it will partner with JPMorgan and Berkshire Hathaway to launch an independent health care company.  Read More

•  Another big tech company is taking to the health care industry. Uber is teaming up with health care organizations to provide rides for patients going to and from medical appointments without even needing to open the Uber app.  That means patients without a smartphone can become Uber customers because rides can be schedule for patients through their doctor's office. Uber is hoping to break the transportation barrier that often impedes access to good health care.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.



The team attending the 2017 National MGMA
Conference in Anaheim, CA last October


At pMD, we thrive on providing user-friendly, intuitive, and amazing software that makes doctors happy! As a member of the sales team, I can tell you that a great way to accomplish this is to get in front of prospective customers, face-to-face and what better way to do that than to travel to conferences across the nation? We work with over 20 different medical specialities to provide a highly customizable charge capture solution, secure messaging software, MIPS Registry, and even a care coordination tool. pMD attends many different conferences on a yearly basis, ranging from specialty-specific to national, in order to connect with these prospective customers.


Our engagements at conferences start long before the actual conference itself. Weeks before the conference begins, we scan the attendee list for our current customers, providing opportunity to schedule some time to say hello and set aside some much needed catch up time. We also note any groups that have previously reached out to pMD about our products. This is a great opportunity to reach out and evaluate if the group is still looking for a solution. We invite these folks to drop by and hopefully establish a good time to sync up.


Attending a conference as an exhibitor is always an enjoyable experience. We can always expect folks to drop by our booth and ask questions about pMD and its products. Due to pMD being highly customizable and our time at the conference being limited, it is important that we’re able to “qualify” a lead quickly while on the spot and decide if pMD would be a good fit at their practice. During these short interactions, we aim to schedule a more in-depth workflow discussion for the following week when the conference is finished.


We’ve discovered many benefits from attending conferences over the years. It is a great opportunity for us to meet potential customers and establish relationships. We also love attending these conferences to witness in what ways pMD could potentially help practices solve problems and how we can provide a product that streamlines their workflow. Due to the ever changing health care industry, we value these conferences greatly because we also learn from our peers and practices.


If you see pMD at a future conference, we invite you to stop by our booth and say hello! Regardless of future business opportunities, we enjoy meeting new folks and love sharing pMD’s signature swag: stick-on mustaches.


 If you'd like to find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, and care coordination software and services, please contact pMD.







Image: Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Senate Finance Committee is examining potential strategies that could improve care access and treatment quality surrounding the opioid epidemic. Interoperability is one of the major roadblocks to data sharing capabilities between states who participate in programs that monitor prescription drugs. Data access needs to be a seamless and streamlined process for providers.  Read More

•  There are major disparities plaguing post-surgical discharges across the country. Patients undergoing the same type of surgery are discharged home while a portion are sent to a post-acute facility. New payment programs such as bundled payments can address these disparities by calling for more studies on the specific needs of patient populations and meeting those needs.  Read More

•  Emergency rooms are a hot bed for pain and pain management. Patients who come to the ER for pain relief are often prescribed medications like Percocet or Vicodin, which have contributed to the rising opioid epidemic. Physicians are now looking for alternatives to help reduce opioid abuse. Ten Colorado hospitals successfully participated in a sixth-month pilot project aimed at reducing prescription painkiller use.  Read More

•  A new study recently found that empowering the roles of midwives in the U.S. could significantly boost maternal and infant health. Compared to many European and Scandinavian countries where midwives oversee most expectant and new mothers, severe maternal complications have more than doubled in the U.S. in the last 20 years.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Imagine, if you can, a world where medical information crosses boundaries - safely, reliably, timely, as effortlessly as water. What is required to create such permeable boundaries? Sure, there are the base technical requirements. System B must be able to read, understand, and digest System A’s output. As convoluted as medical information standards can be, there are reliable pieces there. Reliable yet limited.

So, to achieve something more dynamic, deeper, and more useful, what is required?  I think trust plays an outsized role. I am not talking about the trust inherent in the security profiles of each system, though that is important. I'm talking about the trust of the people involved. The human element.  You need to know who you are working with, what they are about, and establish if they are on the same page.

At pMD, we actively seek out partners with whom we can achieve richer technical connections as well as dynamic personal collaborations.  A recent example is the links we are building with a regional EMR company called iMed.  iMed reached out to us last year as they were assessing partners to perform the MIPS registry role for their customers.  Their dream was to create a new module in their software allowing their customers to collect quality data as they entered clinical data into iMed. This made a lot of sense. Capturing quality data in real time would help their customers achieve their MIPS reporting goals and set them up for ongoing success as the medical market continues to reach towards measurements beyond the raw financial value of services.

We met their team, shared what pMD does and what they needed and found a compelling fit.  As they developed this new module we worked closely with their team to share what registry reporting requires so they could consider those requirements in their software.  Finally, we attended their user group meeting, spoke with their customers alongside their team to better link their customers, the module, and pMD’s MIPS registry services together.

We are currently rolling out version one of our collaboration, which allows for regular data uploads from our now mutual customers into pMD, sharing that data back with the reporting providers, and targeting gaps and opportunities for improvement.  The goal is to fully automate this process this year.

It has been a rewarding and productive collaborative effort to create real interoperability between iMed and pMD, for the benefit of those providers using both systems. This type of work is part of fulfilling our mission to make doctors happy and we hope for many years working with our friends at iMed and others who want to create more vital, dynamic, and trusting health care data ecosystems.

 If you'd like to find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, and care coordination software and services, please contact pMD.

Image: iStock

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is making it their top priority to modernize the agency. The Anywhere to Anywhere initiative aims to allow VA medical providers to practice telehealth across state lines, expanding access to care for veterans who have historically encountered unreasonably long wait times at VA facilities.  Read More

•  Before-school exercise programs that allow children to run around and play for an hour before the start of school may improve children's physical and mental well-being, according to a recent study. While more research is still being conducted, we know most parents wouldn't be opposed to a program that aligns with their morning work schedules!  Read More

•  While research suggests that fewer and fewer people are religious, interest in spiritual care still remains high for patients in the hospital. Many hospitals offer spiritual services such as prayer rooms and support from chaplains. To prepare for the rigors of hospital jobs, chaplains often undergo training, which sometimes includes an interfaith approach.  Read More

•  A patient goes in for a urine test and comes out with a $17,850 bill. Sounds ridiculous, right? While this bill was wildly excessive, prices for urine tests, especially those for patients with chronic pain at high risk of opioid abuse, can vary widely depending on the complexity and technology used. Bills can continue to climb as labs check for levels of multiple drugs and bill for each one.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Irina Marwan/Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Experts in health care IT rank device cybersecurity as number one on a list of top 10 challenges facing health care in 2018.  Some tips on how to enhance medical device security? Buying medical devices equipped with the proper security tools and conducting an inventory of medical devices and related software as part of the purchasing process are just some of the measures health care facilities can take to protect themselves from future cyber attacks.  Read More

•  Gelato is more than just a delicious, cold treat on a hot summer day. The math behind the ratio of ingredients is what makes gelato a desired dessert and skimping on sugar, which is considered critical in creating that smooth consistency, could be disastrous. However, new technology aims to remove sugar from gelato without taking away from the flavor.  Read More

•  A new spending measure, passed by the House of Representatives this Tuesday, includes funding for several health care programs for two years. However, the House bill is likely to undergo significant rewrites in the Senate to pave the way for long-term spending.  Read More

•  In a recent study published on Tuesday in the journal JAMA, researchers found that fetal alcohol syndrome and other alcohol-related disorders among children in the U.S. are as common as autism. This statistic is more that previously thought. These children suffer from neurological damage caused by mothers drinking alcohol during pregnancy.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Eye of Science/Science Source

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  A recent and dangerous trend that picked up in December is now responsible for an uptick of poisonings and ceases to slow in the new year. The Tide Pod Challenge, as it is known, has become a bizarre phenomenon, mostly involving teenagers who challenge each other to intentionally ingest the candy-like laundry pods. Potential side-effects include seizures, coma, and even death. Will this prompt Tide to redesign their product?  Read More

•  Patients with chronic illness often times have more to deal with than just managing their illness itself. They're also having to be their own medical record manager because electronic health systems across several different medical facilities never talk to each other. Patients are finding there isn't one, simplified, and centralized record keeping system. This can lead to inaccuracies and miscommunications surrounding patient care.  Read More

•  On Tuesday, Amazon announced it is partnering with JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Berkshire Hathaway to launch into the health care space. The focus will be on simplified, high-quality, and transparent technology solutions in health care at a reasonable cost.  Read More

•  A recent study found that two types of bacteria commonly found in the gut work together in fueling the growth of colon tumors. Bacteroides fragilis and a strain of E. coli may be the hidden cause of colon cancer, the third most common cancer in the U.S.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

As our customers track increasingly sophisticated amounts of data about their patients in pMD, we’ve begun to receive requests to add more powerful reporting tools to the platform, in order to give those customers more insight into their practice.  They’ve asked us to give them additional power to spot trends and problem areas, and the ability to easily define and monitor key metrics about the health of their patients, and their business.  In response to this, we set out on a journey to build a modern, easy-to-use business intelligence (BI) tool within pMD.

A major challenge that software companies face when building any feature, but especially something as complex as an analytical reporting tool, is to create powerful functionality that is simultaneously extremely intuitive for the user.  In my experience as an engineer, often the instinct when approaching a large problem space is to try to model every aspect of it in software, and expose these various pieces directly to the end user.  However, if not done with care, simply handing the user the controls to a vast number of “bells and whistles” can lead to features that are difficult to understand and generally unintuitive.

To achieve our goal of building an intuitive, yet powerful Custom Reports platform, we’ve been following the words of Leonardo da Vinci: “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”  Rather than bombarding the user with a number of choices and configuration options all at once, we instead try to require the fewest number of decisions possible in order to move forward at each step in the construction of the report.  Anything that can be pushed off until later should be.  

It’s certainly still important to give users the ability to refine and change a number of fine-grained parameters of their reports after their initial construction, but we want this to be an iterative process. Seeing information, and then acting on it is far more intuitive than having to make all of your choices before the first report is ever constructed.  We’re very excited to begin rolling out our new Custom Reports tool later this month in order to give our customers better insights into their valuable business data!

 If you'd like to find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, and care coordination software and services, please contact pMD.

Image: Vahram Muradyan for NPR

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Apple just announced the launch of a new personal health record (PHR) feature with iOS 11.3. Twelve hospitals across the U.S. are participating in the launch. Patients at these hospitals will be able to use Apple's Health Records, as the feature is called, to view their patient information easily and securely. This information is aggregated from both patient-generated data and their electronic medical record from participating hospitals.  Read More

•  With climate change comes a plethora of consequences. A growing fear about one possible consequence is the return of deadly bacteria and viruses that have been preserved for centuries in the frozen ground. As the Arctic's permafrost begins to thaw, is this fear becoming a reality?  Read More

•  To arm or not to arm? Many hospitals across the country have tightened security by bringing in armed guards but many opponents argue that armed guards in hospitals encourages violence rather than prevents it. In addition, uniformed guards carrying weapons can make patients uncomfortable in an environment where patients should be feeling safe.  Read More

•  The Food and Drug Administration rejected a claim on Thursday made by Philip Morris International that their electronic tobacco stick device is safer than traditional cigarettes. Philip Morris International also submitted studies claiming that the electronic tobacco stick reduces the risk of tobacco-related diseases, would reduce exposure to dangerous chemicals, and would be less harmful than conventional smoking.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.