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Health Care Week In Review: Blinded by Stem Cells, Trump's Budget Proposal Cuts Funding, CMS and MIPS, Over-The-Counter Birth Control

Image: Dr. Thomas Albini

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Three women between the ages of 72 and 88 had lost most to all of their eyesight after participating in an unproven treatment where stem cells were injected into their eyes. The women later told doctors they thought they were participating in government-approved research after finding the study listed on a government website provided by the National Institutes of Health. Unfortunately, clinical trials do not need government approval to be listed the site.  Read More

•  In Trump's proposed health care budget, the Department of Health and Human Services should expect to see its budget slashed by more than $15 billion in 2018. The Department of Veterans Affairs, however, would see a $4.4 billion increase. The reduction takes funding away from the nation's foremost medical research agency as well as support programs for low-income individuals.  Read More

•  With the new 2017 Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) performance period underway, providers are left in the dark as to whether or not they must comply with program criteria. Providers that bill $30,000 or less in Medicare charges or give care to 100 or fewer beneficiaries are exempt from MIPS. The Medical Group Management Association is calling for immediate release of 2017 MIPS eligibility information to find out if clinicians are part of the nearly one-third that are eligible for exemption.  Read More

•  Researchers say that over-the-counter birth control pills would be safe for teens and that there is no evidence that adolescents are at greater risk from birth control pills than adult women. In fact, some of the potential negative side effects of oral contraception are less likely in younger adults, according to Krishna Upadhya, assistant professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.