The pMD Blog
Health Care Week in Review: Inaccurate Lead Testing, CPC+ Program, Veterans Under AHCA, Internet Addiction

Image: Mark Fiore for KQED

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Officials warned Wednesday that some blood tests used to check for lead poisoning in women and children since 2014 may have inaccurately reflected safe results from lead exposure, providing false assurance to parents. It is recommended that children under the age of 6 and pregnant and nursing women be re-tested.  Read More

•  The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced Wednesday that four additional regions will have the opportunity to participate in the Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+) model from 2018 to 2022. The CPC+ program rewards primary care providers on value and quality of care. The first round began this year and included 2,800+ practices across 14 regions.  Read More

•  Veterans are being left in the dark about their tax credit fate under the revised American Health Care Act (AHCA), the newest effort to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Under ACA, veterans could take advantage of tax credits to help offset the cost of purchasing insurance coverage, regardless of whether or not they were enrolled in care through the VA. Under the revised AHCA, there are concerns on whether or not those veterans are eligible to get the tax credit.  Read More

•  While digital addictions are not official mental disorders listed in the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V), there's debate among psychologists as to whether that should change. Addictions begin with intermittent or recreational use and progress into daily and sometimes life-threatening use. Psychologists are now seeing a classic addictive pattern of behavior among many internet users.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.