The pMD Blog

Welcome to the
pMD Blog...

where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.

POSTS BY TAG | Android

The most popular mobile operating system in the world has been steadily creeping into the health care scene in America. This week, Android took away another 0.06 percent of the mobile device pie among our health care providers.


Señor Goat reports updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we report the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identify the net winner for the week. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.69%
Android: 9.31%
Android took away .07 percent of net mobile devices from Apple this week. The three most recent Android versions are Ice Cream Sandwich, Jelly Bean, and KitKat. It looks like our doctors are developing a sweet tooth!


Señor Goat reports updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we report the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identify the net winner for the week. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.75%
Android: 9.25%
After the device tug-of-war over the last seven days, the numbers are out: and it's a tie! Android kept up with Apple just enough to hold them in check and not lose any ground by the end of the week. We know that doctors love their smartphones, but a doctor in Seattle is being accused of loving his device more than most doctors.


Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.82%
Android: 9.18%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

Android takes two steps forward, one step back. After a strong 2 weeks in a row gaining on Apple, Android lost .18 percent of the mobile device pie this week.

FINAL


iOS: 90.82%
Android: 9.18%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

For the second week in a row Android has topped Apple in net devices for the week, taking away an additional 0.17 percent of the mobile user base. Perhaps there's a correlation between Android's growth and the excitement around Google's new project that was unveiled this week.

FINAL


iOS: 90.64%
Android: 9.36%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

Android crushed Apple with a 0.15 percent surge in total devices this week. Are doctors abandoning their iPhones for one of Google's progenies?

FINAL


iOS: 90.81%
Android: 9.19%

Accessing health care information on mobile devices is not just a trend anymore; it’s the new norm. The last couple of years has seen tremendous growth in the number of mobile health care apps that make doctors more efficient and improve patient care; mobile EHRs, charge capture, secure text messaging, drug references, and diagnostic support, to name a few.

With such critical patient information at the hands of our doctors, these apps have to be secure and robust. Whether hospital WiFi is spotty, certain care locations don’t have WiFi, or cellular reception is limited, doctors still have to be able to access important medical information on-command from their array of health care apps. Say, for example, you’re a patient in the hospital. Your doctor pulls out his or her smartphone to find what drug dose to prescribe you, only to find out that the hospital WiFi signal has dropped, and along with it, any immediate access to the necessary health information to find this out. As a doctor, this would be frustrating. As a patient, this would be frustrating and unsettling.

This is where the Native app vs. Web app distinction comes into play. A native app is developed for one particular mobile device, like the iPhone or Android, and is installed directly onto the device itself. It works standalone and can be used offline. A Web app, on the other hand, is an Internet-based app that runs on the mobile device’s Web browser, like Safari. So if you want to access information from an app when you’re in a cell reception void, like parts of most hospitals, you’ll want a native app. If you want your doctor to be able to access your medical information on a secure mobile device to deliver faster and more accurate care, you’ll want your doctor using native apps.

Apple will be releasing its earnings report later today, and we at pMD were wondering if we could predict or corroborate the existing market expectation: Apple went sideways in Q2. I wrote earlier that in the mobile wars, Android is gaining on iOS, but that in our niche (charge capture and secure messaging for medical professionals), Apple is still dominant. The question is, has anything changed in the pMD device breakdown between the last earnings call and today?

Before revealing the numbers, it’s important to note that our company inevitably and officially ended support for BlackBerry on March 31, so there was a forced migration of 1.22 percent of our users to Android and iOS devices. How does this affect the trends? We're not sure, but it's not going to stop us from making wild predictions, kind of.


Looking at the charts, Android gained 0.8 percent and iOS gained 0.45 percent market share among doctors, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants using pMD. This supports the lackluster market expectations, and if anything else, hints at even lower expectations for the Q2 results. With that said, eyes (medical and otherwise) are already set on rumors and hopes of Apple announcements in June.
A few weeks ago, I surveyed the battle for market share between iOS and Android and the large discrepancy between the general market and enterprise breakdown, especially in medicine. Yet given the sad tale of the BlackBerry’s fate in my last post, we can’t take anything for granted. As a service to the curious, I’ll be posting regular updates on the device breakdown for pMD’s mobile charge capture app -- available on both the Google Play Store and Apple’s App Store. I’ve even included the BlackBerry, which may or may not survive the Thunderdome. Stay tuned.

In my last post, I painted a picture of a war between Apple and Google for the brains of our mobile devices. Some inquisitive readers, however, wondered why I didn't mention anything about another well-known contender, BlackBerry. (No one asked about Windows.) The answer shouldn't be surprising for anyone following the news. As of last month, BlackBerry had just 0.6 percent of the market (http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/blackberrys-market-share-falls-below-others/). Similarly, for the pMD charge capture app, BlackBerry accounts for only 0.7 percent of mobile users.


Mobile Market Share Pie Chart



Looking at the last few years of pMD users, the trend is clear.


BlackBerry User Trends from 2012-2014



Of our current users who had BlackBerry devices, more than 92 percent switched to iOS devices, and the rest switched to Android.

The reasons why BlackBerry fell from its once-envied position will be the subject of case studies for business students for years to come. Yet it's easy to forget that we stand on the shoulders of BlackBerry. When I joined pMD as a software engineer in 2009, BlackBerry accounted for more than half of our user base. I heard firsthand from doctors and nurses how much they loved their devices, from the efficiency of their physical keyboards to their robust messaging--BlackBerry was cool. It’s easy to forget that BlackBerry was called “Crackberry,” a nickname no modern device has inherited.

Even though the fate of RIM and BlackBerry serves as a cautionary tale that nothing in technology is sacred, it is also a chance to reflect on what they made possible. In particular, here at pMD, we can reflect on how they helped make mobile charge capture and in fact mobile medicine a reality.