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where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.

POSTS BY TAG | Apple

The most popular mobile operating system in the world has been steadily creeping into the health care scene in America. This week, Android took away another 0.06 percent of the mobile device pie among our health care providers.


Señor Goat reports updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we report the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identify the net winner for the week. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.69%
Android: 9.31%
Android took away .07 percent of net mobile devices from Apple this week. The three most recent Android versions are Ice Cream Sandwich, Jelly Bean, and KitKat. It looks like our doctors are developing a sweet tooth!


Señor Goat reports updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we report the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identify the net winner for the week. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.75%
Android: 9.25%
After the device tug-of-war over the last seven days, the numbers are out: and it's a tie! Android kept up with Apple just enough to hold them in check and not lose any ground by the end of the week. We know that doctors love their smartphones, but a doctor in Seattle is being accused of loving his device more than most doctors.


Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.82%
Android: 9.18%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

Android takes two steps forward, one step back. After a strong 2 weeks in a row gaining on Apple, Android lost .18 percent of the mobile device pie this week.

FINAL


iOS: 90.82%
Android: 9.18%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

For the second week in a row Android has topped Apple in net devices for the week, taking away an additional 0.17 percent of the mobile user base. Perhaps there's a correlation between Android's growth and the excitement around Google's new project that was unveiled this week.

FINAL


iOS: 90.64%
Android: 9.36%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

Android crushed Apple with a 0.15 percent surge in total devices this week. Are doctors abandoning their iPhones for one of Google's progenies?

FINAL


iOS: 90.81%
Android: 9.19%
We received a lot of great feedback from our post charting the upgrade rate of the latest version of our charge capture app in the iOS App Store. One relevant point I didn’t delve into was the iOS breakdown of our user base, which affects the 58 percent that had upgraded.

Since last year, our app has required iOS 7 (or later versions) to upgrade. So given the breakdown of iOS versions being used by our customers, only 85 percent of them have the auto update feature available.


In order to measure the efficacy of the update, we can calculate the percentage of our user base to have upgraded their app to only include the pool that was eligible to do so, i.e. those with iOS 7. The trend, however, remains the same.


There is still as a surge in the first couple of days, followed by a steady incremental increase afterward.

Supporting outdated legacy software has always been viewed as a cost of doing business in the technology industry. Historically, this cost goes up the longer a system has been in existence, and it helps contribute to the well known phenomena of larger and older companies innovating less and less for fear of breaking things for their existing customers.

Our charge capture app has been around since the early days of iPhone OS 1.x. A lot has changed since 2008, and it’s taken some herculean efforts to keep pace with iOS’s rapid evolution. Not only that, but it has to be done in the medical world, one of the most technologically conservative sectors of society (we still can’t stop support for IE6!). Yet the fact that it’s been possible at all must also be credited to the design of the platform itself, modern developer tools, and also (for better or worse) the culture of constantly trading-up one’s smartphone to the newest and shiniest.

All of this led to the decision to make iOS 7 the minimum requirement for our app even though we anticipated some blowback. Yet this never materialized to the extent we anticipated, if at all. This bodes well not only for the general rate of innovation that can be maintained for more and more people, but it also gives hope that the historical lack of innovation in medical software may be diminishing. This is good news not only for doctors but patients as well--not to mention software engineers.
As of last week, we released version 8 of pMD’s iOS charge capture application, which fully supports secure text messaging between providers and staff in and between practices. One of the inherent challenges in mobile development is trying to keep your user base up to date with the newest version of your app. Not only does this ensure that users get the latest features and performance improvements, it also helps keep the organization agile by not having to support and maintain backward compatibility with legacy versions. With fewer strings attached to the past, a small team of developers can deliver above their weight class.

Like many companies that support native applications on mobile devices, we always struggled with getting enough of our users to upgrade to the latest version in a timely manner. Last year, Apple helped alleviate this problem by introducing auto-update to applications. In the first few days after the update, there was an inevitable spike in upgrades, followed by a linear-like rate. A little more than a week after its release, over 58 percent of our user base is now updated to the latest version of the app, which is a much faster adoption rate than we had for previous versions.


There are several reasons, however, why this number isn’t higher: some users have auto-update turned off, haven’t used pMD since the app updated, are prevented from updating the app due to not yet having iOS 7+, or are simply afraid of change. So even though the problem of legacy app support is improving, it is by no means solved. There really won’t be a silver bullet other than customer education and building updates that persuade the most skeptical hold outs that an update is worth while.

Apple will be releasing its earnings report later today, and we at pMD were wondering if we could predict or corroborate the existing market expectation: Apple went sideways in Q2. I wrote earlier that in the mobile wars, Android is gaining on iOS, but that in our niche (charge capture and secure messaging for medical professionals), Apple is still dominant. The question is, has anything changed in the pMD device breakdown between the last earnings call and today?

Before revealing the numbers, it’s important to note that our company inevitably and officially ended support for BlackBerry on March 31, so there was a forced migration of 1.22 percent of our users to Android and iOS devices. How does this affect the trends? We're not sure, but it's not going to stop us from making wild predictions, kind of.


Looking at the charts, Android gained 0.8 percent and iOS gained 0.45 percent market share among doctors, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants using pMD. This supports the lackluster market expectations, and if anything else, hints at even lower expectations for the Q2 results. With that said, eyes (medical and otherwise) are already set on rumors and hopes of Apple announcements in June.
A few weeks ago, I surveyed the battle for market share between iOS and Android and the large discrepancy between the general market and enterprise breakdown, especially in medicine. Yet given the sad tale of the BlackBerry’s fate in my last post, we can’t take anything for granted. As a service to the curious, I’ll be posting regular updates on the device breakdown for pMD’s mobile charge capture app -- available on both the Google Play Store and Apple’s App Store. I’ve even included the BlackBerry, which may or may not survive the Thunderdome. Stay tuned.