The pMD Blog

Welcome to the
pMD Blog...

where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.

POSTS BY TAG | Apple

In my last post, I painted a picture of a war between Apple and Google for the brains of our mobile devices. Some inquisitive readers, however, wondered why I didn't mention anything about another well-known contender, BlackBerry. (No one asked about Windows.) The answer shouldn't be surprising for anyone following the news. As of last month, BlackBerry had just 0.6 percent of the market (http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/blackberrys-market-share-falls-below-others/). Similarly, for the pMD charge capture app, BlackBerry accounts for only 0.7 percent of mobile users.
mobile-market-share-chart copy

Looking at the last few years of pMD users, the trend is clear.
blackberry-user-trend-chart copy

Of our current users who had BlackBerry devices, more than 92 percent switched to iOS devices, and the rest switched to Android.

The reasons why BlackBerry fell from its once-envied position will be the subject of case studies for business students for years to come. Yet it's easy to forget that we stand on the shoulders of BlackBerry. When I joined pMD as a software engineer in 2009, BlackBerry accounted for more than half of our user base. I heard firsthand from doctors and nurses how much they loved their devices, from the efficiency of their physical keyboards to their robust messaging--BlackBerry was cool. It’s easy to forget that BlackBerry was called “Crackberry,” a nickname no modern device has inherited.

Even though the fate of RIM and BlackBerry serves as a cautionary tale that nothing in technology is sacred, it is also a chance to reflect on what they made possible. In particular, here at pMD, we can reflect on how they helped make mobile charge capture and in fact mobile medicine a reality.
Sometime after 2008, folks all over the country started having heated arguments with friends and family about some fundamental issues that were facing our world. A lot of times it seemed like they were talking past each other, completely frustrated with why the other side just didn’t see what they considered to be completely obvious and self-evident. Friendships were strained and Thanksgiving dinners became even more awkward. Unfortunately, cool-heads have not prevailed. The lack of communication has increased, and the volume of discourse has only gotten louder. I’m not talking about politics or religion, but the smartphone battles that began with the unveiling of the first iPhone and Android smartphones -- which platform is superior? Years later, we still wonder: Can there be a resolution, and peace in our time?

The global market share numbers seem to indicate that the debate should be over. Android’s current global smartphone market is almost 80 percent according to some reports, leaving iOS to roughly only 17 percent of the market. If the numbers paint such a clear picture, then why doesn’t it feel like we all live in a peaceful monopolistic world of Android? The answer may be that although 80 percent of the market is dominated by one platform, it’s not a homogenous domination, and there are gritty pockets of resistance. Your grandmother’s sewing club, for example, may be diehard Android users while the juniors at Jefferson High can’t fathom anything other than an iPhone. The enterprise world is one such niche, and one that Apple still clearly dominates. A recent report puts iOS at over 73 percent of enterprise users with Android being a lowly 26 percent.

Does the medical world follow the enterprise breakdown? At pMD, we deal with mobile charge capture software, and we’re in a unique position to try to answer this. Based on today’s numbers, our device breakdown is even more skewed than the national numbers in favor of Apple. Currently, health care providers prefer Apple over Android devices to the tune of 92 to 8 percent.


We can also answer whether we’re seeing iOS users flocking to Android or vice versa. From the data, it doesn’t seem so. Only 1-2 percent of pMD charge capture users have switched sides.


Even more rare are the users who are “Dual Citizens,” those actively using both Android and iOS devices. Sadly, the voice of compromise is nowhere to be found. Only 1.6 percent of users have both types of devices, making them quite rare and exotic. If you see them, take a picture.

Where does all this leave us? Well, it would seem that if you’re targeting the medical mobile world and you have to pick one platform to support first, iOS should be it. Yet, that may be too simplistic as most medical apps are inherently social and you would ideally need to support both out of the gate.

The story isn’t finished. Android took only a few years to surpass iOS in global market share, and there’s no guarantee a similar turnaround can’t happen in the medical or enterprise worlds. So check back here often as we track real time numbers, plot armchair strategy, and keep score in the greatest battle of our time.
This Valentine’s Day, don’t go traditional with your gifts for your significant other. We’re in the heart of the smartphone era and there are some sweet phones on the market right now. Here are some different new devices that offer great features for doctors using mobile charge capture:





Apple


The most popular smartphone on the market, Apple’s iPhone offers consistency and has arguably the most intuitive user experience, great for doctors of all technical aptitudes. The iPhone’s unmistakable shape and apple silhouette on the back of every device is also a draw for the more design minded individuals.

iPhone 5S, 5C: The iPhone’s new processor makes this one fast phone, so you can spend less time waiting for your phone to load and more time with patients. The App Store is an app heaven and is usually the first to get new apps and updates. And the fingerprint recognition on the 5S is also a nice touch for increased security, or for those of us who just can’t possibly remember yet another passcode.

Android


Android smartphones come in a wide variety of forms, all running Google’s mobile platform. Whether its the screen size, price, customization, or durability, each Android has its own unique selling point and differences. We would be here all night if we listed out every Android device available, so here are two Android devices that have features that are beneficial for doctors:

Galaxy Note 3: With a whopping 5.7 inch screen size, this phone can display more information more easily, and will still fit in your coat pocket.

Nexus 5: This Android phone has a good battery life so it’s less likely to die while you are rounding and entering in charges, and is Google-owned so it offers quicker software updates.

If you’re still on the fence, just remember: virtual chocolates are calorie-free and a dozen digital roses last forever.
Apple celebrated the 30th birthday of its Macintosh computer this January, reminding the world just how influential this computer and Apple’s technology has been since its birth. Whether you've been following the Mac revolution for the last 30 years, own an iPhone, or simply watched Ashton Kutcher's movie "Jobs" that one time on a plane flight, you recognize the impact the Mac has had not only on the personal computer but across so many different markets.

The Mac has come a long way since it captured the world's attention in 1984, largely due to Apple's disruptive innovation throughout multiple industries. Innovation doesn't mean sticking with the present state because people are content with what they have. It means pushing boundaries, knowing that things can always be improved, risking failure, and disrupting the status quo. And Apple has done just that, affecting markets like publishing, education, and music. The Mac has spawned many creative and impactful devices, and changed the way we look at personal computing. For example, the iPhone, which is essentially a sleek, portable mini-computer, offers the same extensive range of functions that a computer has.

The iPhone has had a huge impact on charge capture, acting as an intuitive and extremely usable mobile platform. It has allowed for the development of innovative charge capture software that has greatly improved the workflows of doctors and medical practices. But what seems like the most efficient and cutting edge charge capture technology today will ultimately disrupt itself down the line as people and companies reinvent it with even greater, unprecedented innovations.

The following article, told from the perspective of an industry analyst who witnessed Steve Jobs walk across the stage in 1984 and unveil the Mac, gives a unique account of the Mac's colorful and influential history. It talks about some of the markets that Apple has impacted and how they were able to do so through their disruptive innovation.
Apple's new iOS 7, released in fall of 2013, presented a fantastic opportunity for us to draw upon the operating system's great new features. Our iOS 7 users are now able to enjoy an unprecedented product update, offering a fresh look and enhanced functionality.

We wanted to give you a glimpse into some of the exciting new features of this product update. pMD for iOS 7 includes both fresh design updates and added functionality, as well as more subtle but equally significant product enhancements. Here is a before and after of what’s changed, highlighting some of the elements we feel are integral to the product update:

 

New Look


The initial, most striking change from previous versions of pMD is the overall redesign of the application. The user interface has been transformed to reveal a cleaner, lighter look and feel to match Apple's new iOS 7 style. We wanted the software to be as beautiful as it is functional!
You may also notice that certain features on the Census, like the search bar and filter, have been relocated to create a more intuitive user experience when navigating the app. The icons along the bottom now read more like a legend and less like a “what does that symbol do?” guessing game.
census-new-v-old

Drafts


Another exciting feature in this update is in the Drafts. We have reorganized the way patient visits are presented in pMD for improved accessibility to current and past visit information. Doctors will now be able to refer to their Drafts to view a history of the patient visits they have created and can keep track of their visit activity in a chronological manner. What we used to dub the visit “bucket” is now more like an organized virtual visit file cabinet.

 

Appointments


The Appointments feature, where doctors can track and create visits for their outpatient appointments and scheduled procedures, now has a sophisticated new look and enhanced functionality for easier navigation. The new calendar bar at the top allows you to skip around to different dates so you can arrive at the desired appointment more quickly, reducing repetitive scrolling.
appointments-new-v-old

pMD for iOS 7 contains incredible new developments and enhancements, only some of which are presented here. iOS 7 is supported on the iPhone 5, 5S, 5C, and iPad 2 and iPad Mini, as well as more recent versions, so be sure to get the newest versions of the these devices to take advantage of this update.