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where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.

POSTS BY TAG | Health Care


Image: Ben Edwards/The Image Bank, via Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Researchers at the American Cancer Society predict there will be a quarter-million new cases of breast cancer in the U.S. in 2017. Women living in the U.S. have a one in eight chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer over their lifetime. However, death rates from breast cancer have declined 39 percent from 1989 through 2015, largely as a result of early diagnosis and advanced treatments.  Read More

•  While tech companies are working hard to help target the opioid crisis, tech can also be seen as a separator. For example, the lack of interoperability and the challenge in changing antiquated provider workflows can stand in the way of opioid prescription management.  Read More

•  It has been a devastating week of wildfires in California's wine country region. The effects of the fires have also extended into the surrounding Bay Area, creating a layer of air pollution that has not been this unhealthy since 1999 and can be compared to high pollution days in China. Officials recommend minimizing outdoor activities and even leaving the region until air quality improves.  Read More

•  On Thursday, the President signed an executive order that aims to revamp health insurance markets in the U.S. While the order itself does not implement any policies, it does seek to direct federal agencies to draft regulations.  However, health care experts and insurers have been vocal about the potential impact and consequences the executive order may bring.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image:  Healthcare IT News

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  On Monday, Health Affairs published research indicating that less than 30% of health system EHRs are fully interoperable, and fewer than 20% of them actually use the data transferred from another provider. Hospitals are urged to demand better interoperability, especially when it comes to discussions about bundled payments.  Read More

•  Bisphenol A, or BPA, is prevalent in many household plastic products, such as food storage containers and water bottles as well as the inside lining of many metal cans, which prevents the leaching of aluminum taste into food or drink. Manufacturers are not required to disclose the use of BPA in their products. Consumption of BPA may be cause for health concerns down the line, so take precautions and do your research!  Read More

•  Internet of Things medical devices are prime targets for cybercriminals. It is imperative for health care systems to take these 5 steps to prevent hackers from gaining access to health information. First, security systems should segment their networks. Second, health care execs should think beyond just network security and consider building security into applications. Third, hospitals must implement authorization protocols. Fourth, health care CIOs should always assess risk and improvement. And lastly, organizations should always monitor device behavior.  Read More

•  A gene therapy milestone had been reached for the first time as doctors were able to hold off a fatal degenerative brain disease, predominantly diagnosed in young boys, with the use of a disabled form of HIV.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: ThinkStock

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new figures on vaccination rates, showing that the influenza vaccination rate has plateaued over the past few seasons. Although the efficacy rate of the vaccine is under 50%, it is still estimated to have prevented more than 5.4 million flu cases and 86,000 hospitalizations last season. Government health officials are urging health care providers to promote the flu vaccine among their patients.  Read More

•  The bipartisan bill, Creating High-Quality Results and Outcomes Necessary to Improve Chronic (CHRONIC) Care Act of 2017, was unanimously passed by the Senate. The bill will expand telehealth access for chronically ill Medicare patients by building broader telehealth benefits into Medicare Advantage plans and expanding the use of virtual care for stroke and dialysis patients.  Read More

•  Senate Republicans have postponed plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act due to insufficient votes for the latest health law overhaul bill. The Graham-Cassidy bill would have taken money provided under the Affordable Care Act for insurance subsidies and the expansion of Medicaid and sent it to states in the form of block grants.  Read More

•  The FDA has selected nine digital health companies to participate in a new pre-certification pilot program. The agency hopes to identify ways that pre-certified companies could potentially submit less information to the FDA than is currently required before marketing a new digital health tool as part of a formal program. The companies selected are: Apple, Fitbit, Johnson & Johnson, Pear Therapeutics, Phosphorus, Roche, Samsung, Tidepool, and Verily.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health IT recently announced two big changes to the meaningful use certification program. The first gives EHR makers the ability to self-declare compliance. The second provides more discretion around randomized surveillance of certified health IT products. These changes are designed to reduce burden on the health care industry.  Read More

•  For the first time, researchers have been able to modify a key gene in human embryo DNA which gives crucial insight into embryo development. This work may someday lead to new techniques that can help infertile couples have children or treat incurable diseases with embryonic stem cells.  Read More

•  In order to earn a small positive adjustment from Medicare, doctors and practices need to begin collecting data no later than Oct. 2 to fully participate in MIPS, or the Merit-based Incentive Payment System's 90-day reporting period. The government has even made it easier for doctors to avoid a payment penalty based on 2017 reporting by allowing them to pick one measure for one patient, at the very minimum.  Read More

•  After a series of failed Senate votes in July, one repeal-and-replace plan for the Affordable Care Act remains. The proposal turns control of the health care markets over to the states. So, rather than funding Medicaid and subsidies directly, that money goes to the state to develop any health care system it wants.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Eric Thayer for The New York Times

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Sixteen people have died and 421 sickened in San Diego County between last November through September as a result of a Hepatitis A outbreak. About 65% of the infections occurred among the homeless or illicit drug user population. Hepatitis A is typically spread by ingestion of contaminated food or water and in rare cases, transmitted person-to-person through fecal-oral route.  Read More

•  Two neighborhoods in Houston have reported contaminated floodwaters containing bacteria and toxins that sicken people. The results of the testing found that the water contained Escherichia coli at a level more than four times the amount that is considered safe. Residents must take precautions to return safely to their homes.  Read More

•  A new bipartisan bill would build telehealth coverage into Medicare Advantage plans. This bill would encourage the use of telehealth technology to improve health care for seniors, particularly for those in rural parts of the country.  Read More

•  Eight elderly residents of the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills in Hollywood, Florida, died after a transformer that drove its air conditioning unit broke down, leaving residents vulnerable to the unforgiving heat and humidity. Health officials suspended the nursing home indefinitely and have moved 158 residents from the center to nearby facilities.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, Houston health systems were able to access medical records thanks to a robust IT infrastructure, EHR adoption and HIE agreements. These health systems set up makeshift virtual clinics in evacuation centers across Houston, allowing providers to connect to medical records, order medications and input patient data.  Read More

•  Specialists oversee the care of the most costly and sickest patients in the nation and therefore are increasingly responsible for driving the value-based care model. Some suggested strategies to deliver more effective care and consumer engagement, which may become requirements in the future, include having specialty practices invest in insight platforms and advanced analytics. These technologies are not yet widely adopted in health care but are important in the future success of delivering value-based care.  Read More

•  Medicare patients beware: you can be hospitalized for several days, can undergo exams and tests, and can receive medications without ever officially being admitted to the hospital. What does that mean for you as a patient? This technically means you're "under observation" and considered an outpatient versus an inpatient, which may deny coverage for subsequent nursing home care.  Read More

•  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on Wednesday its first approval of a cell-based gene therapy in the U.S. The treatment, known as CAR-T cell therapy, will involve removing immune system T cells from each patient and genetically modifying the cells in the lab to attack and kill leukemia cells.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  A new technique called "genome cloaking" allows researchers to access specific gene mutations while still keeping the patient's private genetic information protected. Researchers from Stanford University developed this method, which uses cryptography to hide genetic information, to protect patients' privacy while doctors perform genetic analyses.  Read More

•  While wearables remain a popular tech purchase, actual ongoing user engagement and evidence proving the health benefits still continues to be a challenge. Researchers are still trying to find ways to integrate wearables into health care, specifically with patient care.  Read More

•  Johnson & Johnson paid $417 million in damages to Eva Echeverria of East Lost Angeles, who developed ovarian cancer after using the company's baby powder product for decades. Numerous studies have linked talcum powder use with ovarian cancer but the findings have not been consistent. This may be the largest award so far among lawsuits tying ovarian cancer to talcum powder.  Read More

•  Didn't heed the protective eye-cover warnings during Monday's Great American Eclipse? Chances are, your quick glances may not have caused permanent, long-term damage to your eyes. However, it takes at least 12 hours before knowing if anything has happened. If your vision seems blurry or you're seeing spots, make an appointment with your optometrist to further assess any damage to your eyes.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Stuart Bradford

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized a 90-day reporting rule for meaningful use of electronic health records. Going into effect October 1, 2017, CMS will allow a 90-day reporting period, which previously was a one-year requirement.  Read More

•  Applying "design thinking" to hospitals, in which the innovations come from employees working in the field as opposed to administrators, helps designers tackle many challenges with fresh solutions, saving both dollars and lives. Design thinking is useful for when a service, for example, is fundamentally broken. It allows for creative problem solving and is paramount to the improvement of patient care.  Read More

•  According to a study published on Wednesday, a team of scientists successfully edited genes in human embryos to repair a common and serious disease-causing mutation. For the first time, scientists were able to produce apparently healthy embryos as a result of this gene-editing technique.  Read More

•  Jerome Adams, M.D. has been confirmed as surgeon general by a Senate committee. Adams, alongside four others who have been confirmed for positions within the Department of Health and Human Services, will now go before the full Senate for confirmation. If confirmed by the full senate, Dr. Adams will replace recently dismissed Vivek Murthy.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Fierce Healthcare

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  On Thursday night, Republican Senators failed to pass the "skinny" bill, which would have said goodbye to ACA's "individual mandate." The mandate required that nearly every American have insurance or pay a penalty and was one of Obamacare's least popular provisions. Insurers, doctors, consumer advocates, and health policy experts agreed that this repeal would have wrecked the individual market.  Read More

•  Amidst the rumors that Apple is in talks with health care organizations to explore the realm of health records, reports that Amazon is considering developing an EHR platform are stirring. Amazon has reportedly started a secret lab in Seattle, its headquarters, and has a crew working on health care applications for Amazon devices.  Read More

•  How up-to-date are you on health care news? Take this fun, online quiz by The New York Times to find out!  Read More

•  While there has been significant progress in research surrounding sports-related head injuries, there is little data on women as most research participants tend to be male athletes.  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently began to require scientists to include female animals in brain injury studies.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Takao Someya/University of Tokyo

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is working on new strategies to enroll more children in longitudinal studies that are part of their precision medicine cohort program. The All of Us Research Program aims to conduct genomic research and responsibly engage children in the decades-long studies.  Read More

•  This week, the GOP's repeal-and-delay measure lacked the votes to move forward after three Republican senators opposed the plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell could only afford to lose two votes on this bill. The White House said in a statement on Tuesday that it would back whichever strategy results in repealing the ACA.  Read More

•  Scientists have developed a new, wearable sensor that can monitor your body's activities. The sensor is lightweight, thin and flexible. It resembles that of a henna tattoo and can monitor vital signs over a long period of time. Researchers hope that it can monitor a patient's vital signs without any discomfort.  Read More

•  With financial incentives and penalizations in place to reduce hospital readmissions, the readmission rate declined 20 percent since its inception in 2012 under the Affordable Care Act.  Such a decline led some researchers to be concerned about unintended consequences, such as more deaths as patients are kept out of the hospital. In a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, no evidence was found that the reduction in hospital readmissions resulted in more deaths.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.