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where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.

POSTS BY TAG | Health Care


Image: Irina Marwan/Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Experts in health care IT rank device cybersecurity as number one on a list of top 10 challenges facing health care in 2018.  Some tips on how to enhance medical device security? Buying medical devices equipped with the proper security tools and conducting an inventory of medical devices and related software as part of the purchasing process are just some of the measures health care facilities can take to protect themselves from future cyber attacks.  Read More

•  Gelato is more than just a delicious, cold treat on a hot summer day. The math behind the ratio of ingredients is what makes gelato a desired dessert and skimping on sugar, which is considered critical in creating that smooth consistency, could be disastrous. However, new technology aims to remove sugar from gelato without taking away from the flavor.  Read More

•  A new spending measure, passed by the House of Representatives this Tuesday, includes funding for several health care programs for two years. However, the House bill is likely to undergo significant rewrites in the Senate to pave the way for long-term spending.  Read More

•  In a recent study published on Tuesday in the journal JAMA, researchers found that fetal alcohol syndrome and other alcohol-related disorders among children in the U.S. are as common as autism. This statistic is more that previously thought. These children suffer from neurological damage caused by mothers drinking alcohol during pregnancy.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Eye of Science/Science Source

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  A recent and dangerous trend that picked up in December is now responsible for an uptick of poisonings and ceases to slow in the new year. The Tide Pod Challenge, as it is known, has become a bizarre phenomenon, mostly involving teenagers who challenge each other to intentionally ingest the candy-like laundry pods. Potential side-effects include seizures, coma, and even death. Will this prompt Tide to redesign their product?  Read More

•  Patients with chronic illness often times have more to deal with than just managing their illness itself. They're also having to be their own medical record manager because electronic health systems across several different medical facilities never talk to each other. Patients are finding there isn't one, simplified, and centralized record keeping system. This can lead to inaccuracies and miscommunications surrounding patient care.  Read More

•  On Tuesday, Amazon announced it is partnering with JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Berkshire Hathaway to launch into the health care space. The focus will be on simplified, high-quality, and transparent technology solutions in health care at a reasonable cost.  Read More

•  A recent study found that two types of bacteria commonly found in the gut work together in fueling the growth of colon tumors. Bacteroides fragilis and a strain of E. coli may be the hidden cause of colon cancer, the third most common cancer in the U.S.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Vahram Muradyan for NPR

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Apple just announced the launch of a new personal health record (PHR) feature with iOS 11.3. Twelve hospitals across the U.S. are participating in the launch. Patients at these hospitals will be able to use Apple's Health Records, as the feature is called, to view their patient information easily and securely. This information is aggregated from both patient-generated data and their electronic medical record from participating hospitals.  Read More

•  With climate change comes a plethora of consequences. A growing fear about one possible consequence is the return of deadly bacteria and viruses that have been preserved for centuries in the frozen ground. As the Arctic's permafrost begins to thaw, is this fear becoming a reality?  Read More

•  To arm or not to arm? Many hospitals across the country have tightened security by bringing in armed guards but many opponents argue that armed guards in hospitals encourages violence rather than prevents it. In addition, uniformed guards carrying weapons can make patients uncomfortable in an environment where patients should be feeling safe.  Read More

•  The Food and Drug Administration rejected a claim on Thursday made by Philip Morris International that their electronic tobacco stick device is safer than traditional cigarettes. Philip Morris International also submitted studies claiming that the electronic tobacco stick reduces the risk of tobacco-related diseases, would reduce exposure to dangerous chemicals, and would be less harmful than conventional smoking.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is teaming up with 4 health systems to create a non-profit generic drug company. The goal of the four companies, Intermountain Healthcare, Ascension Health, SSM Health, and Trinity Health along with the VA, is to address the issue of high costs and shortages of medications in the U.S. They plan to make more affordable and more available generic medications. Read More

•  While stifling a sneeze may seem like one good method to stop the spread of germs, one rare case of sneeze stifling ended in a ruptured throat for an unsuspecting man in Britain. The force of the sneeze he attempted to stifle when obstructing both his nose and mouth was so strong that the blast of air forcefully made its way through the soft tissue in his throat as tiny bubbles. This caused his neck to swell and a change of voice along with unsettling crackling sensations. Don't worry, after a week, the man was well on his way back to the norm.  Read More

•  With the possibility of a government shutdown looming, health care programs will be threatened with billions of dollars in health care costs, as it did in 2013. The Department of Health and Human Services does have a contingency plan in place in the event of a government shutdown.  Read More

•  Curious about how this year's flu season compares to those of the past? The New York Times' Q&A answers some questions on what to expect of this year's flu season and how it's spreading and well as how historical data compares to the 2016-2017 season.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  There are approximately 1.7 million children across 20 states in the U.S. who could be at risk of losing their Children's Health Insurance Medicaid (CHIP) coverage in February due to shortage of funding. A few states plan to use state funds to make up for the lack of federal funding and the states that can't afford it may resort to freezing enrollment or terminating coverage when federal money dissipates.  Read More

•  For those of us who don't have a gluten sensitivity, pursuing a gluten-free diet may not yield the health benefits we think it would. Unnecessarily avoiding gluten-containing grains in your diet can lower overall digestive health because fiber intake decreases. We also have to remember that gluten-free substitutes are not always any more healthy.  Read More

•  Less than two months after canceling two mandatory bundled payment programs created under the Obama administration, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced it is launching a new bundled payment program under the Trump administration. The Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) Advanced model gives providers an incentive to deliver high-quality and efficient care to their patients.  Read More

•  The opioid crisis continues to devastate the U.S. and health care leaders are turning to new strategies to fight it. In 2018, the focus will be on efforts to assess patients on their pain levels upon admission, educating staff about safe opioid use, patient education, and exploring alternative pain relief methods.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Sophie Sahara Barkham

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Telehealth services and products are on the rise in rural areas. Rural hospitals are especially benefiting from telepharmacy services, which not only offers patients 24/7 pharmacy services but also provides big savings for these rural hospitals. Approximately 95 percent of medications delivered via the telepharmacy program are located in a dispensing machine.  Read More

•  Penalties through the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Reduction Program are responsible for hospitals losing 1 percent of Medicare payments each year. The program, in its fourth year, is meant to improve the quality of patient care. Hospitals are penalized for having too many infections and patient injuries.  Read More

•  Feeling terribly exposed may be a thing of the past when it comes to hospital gowns. In partnership with students from Parsons School of Design, Care and Wear, which specializes in medical wearables, has created a new gown design inspired by the kimono style. This new design ties in the front, allows for more coverage, and replaces five different types of gowns with one.  Read More

•  Overbilling, or upcoding, Medicare for office services has always been a problem and still remains unchanged. Unfortunately, this kind of fraudulent billing does not get doctors into legal trouble. Physicians have long been warned by the Office of Inspector General that they are responsible for billing Medicare at appropriate levels for office visits.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: PhotoAttractive/Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is under scrutiny after investigators found that the FDA did not always evaluate food-borne hazards in a timely manner. The organization is not moving quickly enough to remove contaminated foods from store shelves, leaving consumers at risk.  Read More

•  In 2017, the interoperability discussion centered around private sector innovations more so than federal government policy. While policy guidance from the government is well-meaning, interoperability will truly gain traction when driven from the private sector i.e. vendors, health systems, patients, VC investors, and more.  Read More

•  On Thursday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) clarified its stance on texting patient information on non-secure versus secure platforms. Texting patient orders is prohibited regardless of the platform, however, members of the health care team are allowed to text patient information through a secure, encrypted platform.  Read More

•  Going into labor can be an exciting and often times scary experience. For some minors across the U.S., it can be even more of a challenging experience when they're denied requests for treatments such as epidurals. This is due to laws requiring permission from parents or legal guardians before receiving medical treatment that's not considered emergency care. Doctors and nurses are advocating for a change in policy.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The number of women enrolling in U.S. medical schools has increased in the last few years. In 2017, more women enrolled in med school than men for the first time and made up more than half of the enrollees list this year. This could potentially mean that more women become involved in hospital leadership roles that interact with hospital IT departments as well as digital health innovation positions.  Read More

•  Coconuts or olives? Experts reveal that compared to olive oil, coconut oil contains about six times the amount of saturated fat. Of course, there are still many health benefits to coconut oil but when thinking about cooking with either of these oils, olive oil is the better choice for overall health.  Read More

•  On Thursday, the federal government found 751 hospitals to have the highest rates of patient injuries. These hospitals were penalized with lowered Medicare payments. The penalty has been controversial since its start four years ago by the Affordable Care Act. The program is designed to financially incentivize hospitals to avoid infections and other mishaps.  Read More

•  Scientists have used gene editing  inside mice to prevent a form of inherited deafness. More research is still needed but this gene editing technique could potentially restore hearing, at the very least, to people who have lost it from non-inherent situations, such as a loud noise or infection.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: iStock

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Consumers who are hunting for health insurance during the open enrollment period are either finding prices to be more expensive or are finding cheap deals, depending on subsidy eligibility for 2018. For those who are eligible for subsidies, insurance brokers and analysts are cautioning clients against the temptation to get the inexpensive plans that don't comply with the Affordable Care Act's minimum standards. Some states have extended their open enrollment period past December 15.  Read More

•  The office of the National Coordination for Health IT (ONC) recently published best practices for data management processes, enabling hospitals to more accurately and effectively match patient records.  There are 5 categories published in the Patient Demographic Data Quality Framework across which hospitals can begin to evaluate their own organizations: Data governance, data quality, data operations, platforms and standards, and supporting processes.  Read More

•  In a new study released by the Journal of the American Medical Association, intense treadmill exercise has been found to be safe for those recently diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and may even slow the progression of their condition in the early stages of the disease. Current methods of treatment involve various drugs, most of which lose their effectiveness over time. While more studies have yet to be done, the findings are encouraging.  Read More

•  On Thursday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted in favor to repeal net neutrality regulations. How does this impact telehealth? The new regulatory environment could break telehealth and remote monitoring functionality for providers, patients and vendors, especially those in rural areas of the country. Connectivity is an essential element of telehealth and without it, it doesn't work. Higher prices for connectivity might force providers in rural areas to abandon telehealth programs all together.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Joy Ho for NPR

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  On Monday, Google announced an open source version of their artificial intelligence (AI) tool, DeepVariant. This tool improves the accuracy of genomic sequencing, which addresses one of precision medicine's outstanding challenges. Big tech rivals, such as IBM, Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon are already speculated to be making moves into the health care AI space.  Read More

•  A recent study revealed that women who use hormonal birth control pills or contraceptive devices such as intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) face a small yet significant risk for breast cancer. This is the first study to examine risks associated with current, modern forms of birth control in a large population, however, not the first to establish a link to cancer.  Read More

•  Health care spending in 2016 saw a slow in growth, likely due to an increase in insurance enrollment during the first few years of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, per capita spending topped $10,000 in 2016 and spending per person was $10,348. Experts expect a continuation of growth in health care spending due to an aging population and growing health care costs.  Read More

•  Common ceramic household cookware, such as crockpots, may contain traces of lead, which can leak into food and cause lead poisoning. Where does the lead come from? Ceramic ware is glazed before entering a kiln to bake. Often, these glazes contain lead, which gives ceramic ware their attractive shine. Be sure to refer to the FDA's list of products that have been tested for lead contamination!  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.