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where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.

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Image: Healthcare IT News

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Four lawmakers opposed the newly released Senate health care bill. In a statement Thursday afternoon, Republican Senators Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Mike Lee and Ron Johnson announced their opposition, stating "Currently, for a variety of reasons, we are not ready to vote for this bill, but we are open to negotiation and obtaining more information before it is brought to the floor."  Read More

•  Beef imports from Brazil have been suspended in the U.S. as of Thursday due to safety concerns. A two-year investigation by Brazil's Federal Police found that dozens of federal inspectors were accused of accepting bribes to falsify sanitary permits and allow expired meats to be sold.  Read More

•  According to a new Accenture report, artificial intelligence (AI) applications are expected to save the health care industry $150 billion over the next decade. While these AI applications lead to improvements in efficiency and precision, a few concerns to keep in mind are the challenges of balancing automation and workforce, sound organizational strategy, patient engagement and security.  Read More

•  The proposed MACRA rule released by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services would make it optional for physicians to adopt upgraded EHR systems and can continue using the 2014 Edition Certified EHRs. Hospitals under the current Meaningful Use regulations, however, are still required to upgrade their systems by January 2018.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Indiana University's CEO, Dennis Murphy, is taking a new and more interactive approach to the annual "state of the system" address. He's meeting with IU clinicians and staff members face-to-face at various IU Health facilities, hoping to learn more about staff members' concerns while communicating his vision for the system. This active listening and in-person engagement approach by health care leaders has been proven effective in improving patient and staff satisfaction.  Read More

•  A new study published in Occupational and Environmental Medicine found that noise increases the risk of hypertension. Greek researchers studied 420 people living near an airport and tracked their noise exposure. They found that over the next decade after the study began, there were 71 newly diagnosed cases of high blood pressure. This adds to the nearly half of the study population already diagnosed at the start of the study.  Read More

•  We've heard of drones dropping off packages and food orders directly to customers' doors. But what if drones could do more than simply deliver accoutrements of leisure? Researchers in Sweden have been testing out drone deliveries of automated external defibrillators to cardiac arrest patients. While there is still more research to be done, so far the drones have beat the median response time of ambulances to reach patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest situations.  Read More

•  Some health care organizations are still running on outdated systems or browsers, remaining vulnerable to malware attacks, such as that of WannaCry on May 12.  Many of these organizations simply can not update due to lack of funding. In an unprecedented move by Microsoft, security patches were released to these out-of-date systems, recognizing the elevated risk of such cyberattacks, where normally such patches would not be released for technology the company no longer supports.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Fierce Healthcare

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  As population health management initiatives become more of a priority for many hospitals, EHR vendors like Epic, Cerner and Allscripts emerge as more appealing due to their integrated platforms. Standalone population health management products must compete with these large vendors as hospitals transition to value-based and patient-centric care.  Read More

•  Telehealth patients at Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia were recently interviewed about their experience. The feedback was mostly positive, expressing satisfaction with their telehealth visit and praising the convenience. Surprisingly, according to the study, patients preferred to receive bad news via video while in the privacy of their own home.  Read More

•  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made history on Thursday after it asked Endo Pharmaceuticals to remove its opioid painkiller, Opana ER, from the market. This comes in the wake of a rising opioid epidemic in the U.S. The drug company responded to the FDA stating that it will review the request and are “evaluating the full range of potential options as we determine the appropriate path forward.”  Read More

•  The merger of Anthem and Cigna, two major health insurance companies, has been blocked by a federal judge, concluding that a merger of this kind would reduce competition in the health insurance market and raise prices.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  eClinicalWorks, one of the largest Electronic Health Record (EHR) software vendors in the U.S., agreed to pay a $155 million settlement after allegedly falsifying its Meaningful Use certification. It's the first time the government has held an EHR vendor accountable for not meeting federal standards designed to ensure quality patient safety and care.  Read More

•  The World Health Organization recently released a study detailing the environmental costs of tobacco. From sucking up resources to releasing harmful chemicals in soil and waterways to contributing to worldwide litter, tobacco's environmental impact adds to the already well-known costs to global health.  Read More

•  Zika testing spiked in the month of May but the sharp increase does not directly correlate to a rise in Zika infections, at least as of now. The CDC recommended in early May that all pregnant women who were potentially exposed to be administered two different tests.  Read More

•  In a recent study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, researchers have found that habitual coffee drinkers can still receive an athletic boost from caffeine when needed. This opposes the traditional notion that athletes should abstain from caffeine in the days leading to the big event if they hope to gain any performance boost from it on the big day.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Fierce Healthcare

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Two pharmacists from New York Presbyterian Hospital have teamed up with the hospital to consult with transplant patients virtually, tapping into telehealth to improve care for these specific subset of patients. This approach allows them to continue care after the patients' hospital discharge.  Read More

•  A rare outbreak of botulism has been linked to nacho cheese sauce bought at a gas station in Walnut Grove, California, killing one man and hospitalizing nine others. Botulism is rare, with only 20 cases in adults each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After health officials removed the nacho cheese sauce from the gas station on May 5, the California Department of Public Health said it "believes there is no continuing risk to the public."  Read More

•  According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the American Health Care Act, which is the repeal and replacement to the Affordable Care Act, would reduce the federal deficit by $119 billion by 2026 but would also leave 23 million people uninsured. The CBO also projects that premiums would rise in the coming years.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Mark Fiore for KQED

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Officials warned Wednesday that some blood tests used to check for lead poisoning in women and children since 2014 may have inaccurately reflected safe results from lead exposure, providing false assurance to parents. It is recommended that children under the age of 6 and pregnant and nursing women be re-tested.  Read More

•  The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced Wednesday that four additional regions will have the opportunity to participate in the Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+) model from 2018 to 2022. The CPC+ program rewards primary care providers on value and quality of care. The first round began this year and included 2,800+ practices across 14 regions.  Read More

•  Veterans are being left in the dark about their tax credit fate under the revised American Health Care Act (AHCA), the newest effort to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Under ACA, veterans could take advantage of tax credits to help offset the cost of purchasing insurance coverage, regardless of whether or not they were enrolled in care through the VA. Under the revised AHCA, there are concerns on whether or not those veterans are eligible to get the tax credit.  Read More

•  While digital addictions are not official mental disorders listed in the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V), there's debate among psychologists as to whether that should change. Addictions begin with intermittent or recreational use and progress into daily and sometimes life-threatening use. Psychologists are now seeing a classic addictive pattern of behavior among many internet users.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: The New York Times

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a report Thursday which found that the number of new Hepatitis C cases skyrocketed to nearly 300 percent from 2010 to 2015. The likely culprit: the use of heroin and other injection drugs. Researchers are urging lawmakers to create public health laws to fight the disease.  Read More

•  Providers and payers have began to make investments in IoT (Internet of Things) technologies and programs, anticipating the potential to receive significant financial benefits over the next three years. The Internet of Health Things, or IoHT, is already delivering cost savings but continued investment is essential for long-term success.  Read More

•  Hospital mergers were off to a strong start in the first quarter of 2017 and there are no signs of slowing down. Not all hospitals, however, are choosing this route to offset costs. Being consolidated into another health system is only one strategy hospitals are turning to in order to lower costs and improve the quality of care and patient experience.  Read More

•  A recent analysis found that pain relievers known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can carry cardiovascular risks that may arise within a week of starting the drugs, with the potential to increase with higher doses and duration of treatment.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  A study based in Germany found that binge drinking is associated with an increased heart rate known as sinus tachycardia. The study was conducted over the course of the iconic 16-day beer festival, Oktoberfest. Scientists of this study were particularly interested in what's known as "holiday heart syndrome", in which binge drinkers suffer potentially dangerous atrial fibrillation.  Read More

•  With all the new government requirements imposed on physicians, more specifically the Meaningful Use program, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has created a centralized and more accessible repository as a source of health information for eligible professions. The information within the repository was collected in September and October of 2016.  Read More

•  A drug-resistant fungus called Candida Auris is circulating in the U.S. and is severely affecting the New York and New Jersey areas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that the fungus can persist on surfaces and is easily spread between patients.  Read More

•  On Thursday, House Republican leaders failed to round up votes for their bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act, losing the opportunity for a major legislative win in Trump's first 100 days in office. This hot topic continues to pull Democrats and Republicans to opposite sides of the health care spectrum.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Researchers have turned their attention to the skin of certain frogs, whose mucus can be used to fight flu viruses. This mucus contains antimicrobial peptides, which can neutralize bacteria, fungi and viruses in our immune system. Recently published findings have found that these peptides were just as effective as some antibiotics in fighting bacteria.  Read More

•  Virtual reality is being used as a method to identify fall risks in the elderly population. By disrupting a person's sense of balance, researchers are able to disorient study participants as they walked on a treadmill and recorded their movements. Researchers are interested in learning more about the specific muscle responses that contribute to loss of balance.  Read More

•  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on Thursday that drug manufacturers will be required to update their package inserts to reflect the strongest warning type, alerting doctors and parents to the sometimes fatal consequences of certain painkillers used in children. Harsher restrictions have been imposed by the FDA regarding the use of opioid codeine and tramadol in young children and nursing mothers.  Read More

•  In a recent study, researchers have found a protein in human umbilical cord blood that, in aging mice, improved memory and learning. While there is no indication that it would work in humans at the moment, it's an intriguing glimpse into the potential therapies that might someday work to prevent illnesses that are age-related.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: New York Times/Craig Frazier

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Vitamin D deficiency is likely being over tested and over treated, according to a recent study in Maine. Vitamin D popularity began back in 2000 when medical journals began publishing studies of illnesses believed to be linked to vitamin D deficiency. As a consequence, healthy people who believe they have a deficiency are taking dangerous levels of supplemental doses.  Read More

•  A study published in JAMA this week found that value-based programs yield lower hospital readmission rates and significant cost savings. Researchers examined 2,837 U.S. hospitals between 2008 and 2015 and found that participation in 1 or more of Medicare’s value-based programs, including Meaningful Use, Accountable Care Organization, and the Bundled Payment for Care Initiative, was associated with greater reductions in 30-day readmission rates.  Read More

•  It’s now easier for physicians to get licensed in multiple states thanks to the new Interstate Medical Licensure compact, which launched last week. Qualified physicians can apply for licensing in 18 participating states. This agreement will ease the administrative burden for physicians who practice medicine in multiple states, including locum tenens doctors, doctors in metropolitan areas that include more than one state, and doctors who provide telemedicine services.  Read More

•  New analysis by the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority shows a rising number of medication errors that were attributed in some part to electronic health records and other technologies used to monitor and record patients’ treatment. Researches attributed the errors to system problems and/or user mistakes.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.