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POSTS BY TAG | ICD-10


We wish you a very happy Thanksgiving from your friends at the Charge Capture Blog! To celebrate this gastronomic holiday, and to also encourage you to keep up with your ICD-10 preparation, we’ve found five ICD-10 codes that you may encounter this Thanksgiving.

W61.42XD - Struck by turkey, subsequent encounter
Thanksgiving isn’t the best day for turkeys around the country. If you find yourself confronted with a live turkey, you may want to rethink your Thanksgiving strategy.

W29.0 - Contact with powered kitchen appliance, subsequent encounter
Some kitchen appliances are only brought out a couple of times a year, and not everyone is so adept at using them properly. This diagnosis code applies to casualties from can-openers, mixers, blenders, and garbage disposals.

K21.9 - Gastro-esophageal reflux disease without esophagitis
This might be one of the most common side effects of Thanksgiving, as the holiday is synonymous with "heartburn and indigestion."

W52.XXXA - Crushed, pushed or stepped on by crowd or human stampede, initial encounter
If you are brave (and crazy) enough to participate in the Black Friday sales that now start on Thanksgiving Day, you might experience this unfortunate ICD-10 code.

W22.02XA - Walked into lamppost, initial encounter
The Thanksgiving Day Parade is a tradition that draws thousands of people to the streets to watch the floats and marching bands go by. But be careful, after a few too many cups of hard apple cider, those lampposts can jump out from nowhere!
Finally, and as expected, the announcement medical practices have been waiting for since spring came today. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued a rule this afternoon to finalize the new ICD-10 deadline for October 1, 2015. Shortly after, CMS stated in a press release that this change “allows providers, insurance companies and others in the health care industry time to ramp up their operations to ensure their systems and business processes are ready to go on Oct. 1, 2015.”

The deadline was pushed back on March 31 of this year when the U.S. Senate voted on legislation that included a one-year delay to ICD-10. This delay came as a relief to many medical practices that required additional time and resources to implement an effective ICD-10 plan by the mandatory transition date. Even with the one year extension now formally in effect, medical practices are continuing to press on with their ICD-10 implementation strategies. With a good mobile charge capture system in place the ICD-10 transition is smoother and easier, making the countdown to the new disease classification system less daunting.

Marilyn Tanner, Administrator of CMS, contends that the "ICD-10 codes will provide better support for patient care, and improve disease management, quality measurement and analytics.”

Source: CMS.gov

We’re all excited to move past this frigid, never-ending winter and greet the warmer weather of spring. For me, this season means doing some spring cleaning, and this past weekend, my wife and I spent time on the yard that we have neglected over the past several months. I tend to procrastinate doing the initial work, but I always enjoy seeing the positive transformation of what the yard looks like after our cleaning.

Likewise, it's a also good time to do some spring cleaning around your practice, hospital, or organization. Every year it seems to be the same story: find additional ways to improve revenue and cut costs. In my last post, I discussed questions that you should be asking when evaluating new technology and charge capture software for your organization. Below, I've outlined three areas for your spring cleaning checklist:

1. What is Your Charge Lag for Hospital Billing? The length of time from the date of service to when your billers submit claims can often be days and even months, and some hospital charges may not make it to the office at all. This is an area that proves to be challenging because physicians are extremely busy and moving from one location to the next while being asked to keep up with pieces of paper, index cards, or excel spreadsheets that are the lifeline of the practice's revenue. Reducing your charge lag can be the difference of getting paid faster and earning interest on your revenue. And with some payer deadlines, it can be the difference of getting paid at all.

2. What is Your ICD-10 Plan and Strategy? We all received some extra breathing room on this massive change in health care due to the recent legislation that delayed the implementation of ICD-10 until 2015. However, the well-run organizations and practices that I've spoken with are planning on using the extra time to successfully implement their plans, educate physicians and staff, and move forward with leveraging the extra time to practice their ICD-10 roll-out. This strategy has allowed them to not be caught off guard and rushed, which was a recurring theme with many of the practices I spoke with earlier this year.

3. Are your Physicians and Staff Really HIPAA Compliant? I would conservatively say that eight out of 10 practices and organizations that I speak with recognize that their physicians and staff are sending SMS / text messages that include a form of PHI that could result in a HIPAA compliance violation. Many look the other way or laugh this off stating they cannot get their physicians to stop; however, it's scary to think about what information may be sent through non-secure channels when I think about myself as the patient. The reality to every physician owner, CFO, and compliance officer is that you could be fined up to $50,000 for one HIPAA violation. There is certainly nothing funny about that. Implementing secure, easy-to-use software can assist in eliminating HIPAA violations and instances of non-compliance.

As you study these three areas of your practice, you should be able to uncover opportunities that can have an immediate positive impact and that will put you in a strong position heading into 2015.

In my next post, I'll be sharing ideas of how charge capture can be part of your strategy to improve charge lag, ICD-10 planning, and HIPAA compliance.

The new ICD-10 code set, originally intended to be implemented in 2008, has now seen yet another delay to the October 2014 go-live date. Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives approved the “Doc Fix” legislation, which includes a one-year delay to ICD-10. Tonight, the Senate confirmed that delay, adding another year onto the ICD-10 countdown.

SEC. 212 DELAY IN THE TRANSITION FROM ICD-9 TO ICD-10 CODE SETS.
The Secretary of Health and Human Services may not, prior to October 1, 2015, adopt ICD-10 code sets as the standard for code sets under section 1173(c) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320d-2(c)) and section 14 162.1002 of title 45, Code of Federal Regulations.


This delay, so close to the October 2014 deadline, comes with mixed reviews from health care groups. There has already been a great amount of resources put into the training and funding of ICD-10 education and transition efforts. Well-prepared health care providers have already begun the process of learning the new level of specificity that will be expected of them for each patient visit, and medical coders have begun learning the complexities of these new codes so as to not interrupt reimbursement from payers. These groups who have already started the transition know how difficult it is and will continue to work diligently in the next year to be ready.

Then there are the medical practices and vendors that simply would not have been ready come October 2014, for which this decision comes as a huge sigh of relief. Those who haven’t begun the transition should use this delay as a wake-up call to get started now and take full advantage of the one year gift they’ve just received.

Still, this decision gives everyone more breathing room to develop an effective and seamless ICD-10 plan. Medical organizations have another year to work through the ICD-10 transition, and it’s a big undertaking that requires time from both health care providers and administrators. Having good software in place, such as a charge capture system, will help shrink the time needed to set aside for the transition, and will make the new October 2015 deadline less daunting.
Transitioning to the new ICD-10 code set without a mobile charge capture strategy is like traversing a snowstorm without a shovel. You will get through it (eventually), but it won’t be easy.

With the ICD-10 transition looming later this year, practices are scrambling to get a plan into place. Mobile charge capture can be an important part of that transition for doctors who see patients in hospitals and other locations outside of their office.

When providers are in the clinic environment, there are practice management and medical billing services to keep them organized and efficient with charge entry. But when providers work outside of their office’s four walls to see patients, they often revert to disorganized and inefficient systems of paper, spreadsheets, phone calls, and text messages… napkins, even. Mobile charge capture replaces these systems with intuitive software. It extends the practice to the hospital and the hospital back to the practice, so providers can stay on top of everything in real-time and communicate efficiently from their smartphones and tablets.

It might seem easier to ignore the snowstorm of ICD-10. But addressing your needs now by applying a good mobile charge capture strategy will make the transition smoother and easier.

Read the full article about how mobile charge capture can feel like a day at the beach with your transition to billing with ICD-10: http://www.athenahealth.com/blog/2014/01/29/icd-10-transition-the-benefits-of-a-mobile-charge-capture-strategy/
ICD-10 is the Y2K of the medical world, and it’s coming on Oct. 1, 2014. Those with a good charge capture solution can party like it’s 1999.

http://www.athenahealth.com/blog/2014/01/29/icd-10-transition-the-benefits-of-a-mobile-charge-capture-strategy/