The pMD Blog
POSTS BY TAG | Mobile Technology


Apple lost yet another iOS-Android mobile device battle this week, losing a narrow 0.02 percent of the market share among pMD's charge capture users. This marks the fifth week in a row that Apple has lost a slice of the pie to Android, losing 0.39 percent over that time period. A rumor has surfaced that Apple is planning to release a smaller 4" iPhone next year, breaking the bigger-is-better trend. The source of this rumor is sketchy at best, but if it pans out we'll be eagerly waiting to see how it will affect the mobile device market for health care providers!


Signor Goat reports updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we report the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identify the net winner for the week. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.50%
Android: 9.50%
After a three week skid, Apple finally showed positive growth in the iOS-Android wars among our health care providers! This week, Apple took back .02 percent of the mobile device pie from Android.


Señor Goat reports updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we report the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identify the net winner for the week. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.71%
Android: 9.29%
The most popular mobile operating system in the world has been steadily creeping into the health care scene in America. This week, Android took away another 0.06 percent of the mobile device pie among our health care providers.


Señor Goat reports updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we report the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identify the net winner for the week. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.69%
Android: 9.31%
Android took away .07 percent of net mobile devices from Apple this week. The three most recent Android versions are Ice Cream Sandwich, Jelly Bean, and KitKat. It looks like our doctors are developing a sweet tooth!


Señor Goat reports updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we report the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identify the net winner for the week. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

FINAL


iOS: 90.75%
Android: 9.25%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

Android takes two steps forward, one step back. After a strong 2 weeks in a row gaining on Apple, Android lost .18 percent of the mobile device pie this week.

FINAL


iOS: 90.82%
Android: 9.18%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our charge capture physician users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

For the second week in a row Android has topped Apple in net devices for the week, taking away an additional 0.17 percent of the mobile user base. Perhaps there's a correlation between Android's growth and the excitement around Google's new project that was unveiled this week.

FINAL


iOS: 90.64%
Android: 9.36%
Due to popular demand, Señor Goat will be reporting updates from the front lines of the iOS-Android wars. Each Friday, we will be reporting the current device breakdown of our users and identifying the net winner for the week. Check back every Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of the platform wars.

Android crushed Apple with a 0.15 percent surge in total devices this week. Are doctors abandoning their iPhones for one of Google's progenies?

FINAL


iOS: 90.81%
Android: 9.19%

Accessing health care information on mobile devices is not just a trend anymore; it’s the new norm. The last couple of years has seen tremendous growth in the number of mobile health care apps that make doctors more efficient and improve patient care; mobile EHRs, charge capture, secure text messaging, drug references, and diagnostic support, to name a few.

With such critical patient information at the hands of our doctors, these apps have to be secure and robust. Whether hospital WiFi is spotty, certain care locations don’t have WiFi, or cellular reception is limited, doctors still have to be able to access important medical information on-command from their array of health care apps. Say, for example, you’re a patient in the hospital. Your doctor pulls out his or her smartphone to find what drug dose to prescribe you, only to find out that the hospital WiFi signal has dropped, and along with it, any immediate access to the necessary health information to find this out. As a doctor, this would be frustrating. As a patient, this would be frustrating and unsettling.

This is where the Native app vs. Web app distinction comes into play. A native app is developed for one particular mobile device, like the iPhone or Android, and is installed directly onto the device itself. It works standalone and can be used offline. A Web app, on the other hand, is an Internet-based app that runs on the mobile device’s Web browser, like Safari. So if you want to access information from an app when you’re in a cell reception void, like parts of most hospitals, you’ll want a native app. If you want your doctor to be able to access your medical information on a secure mobile device to deliver faster and more accurate care, you’ll want your doctor using native apps.
We released our secure text messaging product last week and our secure messaging video is finally complete! In this video we exemplify the importance of secure messaging and the consequences associated with underestimating its relevance.

It has been a few months since the pMD team and Belljar first started brainstorming ideas for the video. We had many long discussions as to what we wanted it to look like, what we wanted it to sound like, and even what we wanted it to feel like. There was a lot of blood, sweat, and tears that went into this messaging video, but good tears, not bad ones.

Throughout our creation process, there were plenty of ideas that led to hours of meetings and edits. At one point in our process, we had a lengthy conversation about our character, Dr. Fast Thumbs’, interaction with his patient.

There were R-rated variations of the interaction showing the patient in a vulnerable position that made any woman and most men who saw it cringe. We decided that we needed to tone it a down and were presented with a new version. But with the new G-rated version, we barely saw the patient, and there wasn’t much context as to the “sensitive patient information” that was being shared by Dr. Fast Thumbs. After another discussion, we finalized the scene somewhere between a PG and PG-13 rating, showing the patient head on, but above the patient's knees.

Whether it was the style of background music or the actions of our characters, we broke down each others’ ideas and created a cohesive and comprehensive story that explains what secure messaging means for health care practices. Not everyone may understand the significance of secure messaging, but to people in the medical field, they either know how serious it is, or they will after watching our segment. By sending unencrypted messages, you open yourself up to the possibilities of fines, lawsuits, and even jail time.

We hope that our secure text messaging video helps the medical world understand why encryption and HIPAA compliance is important. Without further ado, enjoy the video!

A few weeks ago, I surveyed the battle for market share between iOS and Android and the large discrepancy between the general market and enterprise breakdown, especially in medicine. Yet given the sad tale of the BlackBerry’s fate in my last post, we can’t take anything for granted. As a service to the curious, I’ll be posting regular updates on the device breakdown for pMD’s mobile charge capture app -- available on both the Google Play Store and Apple’s App Store. I’ve even included the BlackBerry, which may or may not survive the Thunderdome. Stay tuned.