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POSTS BY TAG | telehealth

Increasing medical practice revenue


Patient adherence within the medical community can mean different things to different providers depending on the specialty. For patients that require therapeutic drug monitoring, adherence to medication can mean the difference between wellness and illness. An estimated 30 to 50 percent of U.S adults are not adherent to long-term medications, so one can only imagine the difficulties that brings for both patients and providers. 

What is therapeutic drug monitoring?


In the simplest of terms, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a form of testing that tells a provider the concentration of certain medications in a patient’s blood and what bodily systems it may be impacting. TDM is used in a variety of specialties to include, but is not limited to, cardiology, internal medicine, neurology, psychiatry, pulmonology, nephrology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, and many others. 

A patient is first deemed a good candidate for a medication requiring TDM based on several factors such as age, weight, current organ function, current medication regimen, or even results from pharmacogenomic testing. Once the medication is prescribed, a predetermined length of time passes before the patient is required to undergo routine laboratory work to test for current medication concentration along with a clinical assessment to rule out signs or symptoms of side effects. Providers then use their clinical judgment to determine if the medication must be adjusted, which then requires the patient to return again at a predetermined time for ongoing assessments. 

The importance of therapeutic drug monitoring


One may ask themselves: “Why does it even matter? The medication works or it doesn’t.” Certain medications have a narrow therapeutic window which can cause concern for patient wellness if medication is taken outside of that window. Providers use TDM to determine important factors such as non-adherence, subtherapeutic levels, and toxicity. The ability to identify if the patient is adherent to prescribed therapies as well as identifying the need to adjust medications to prevent patient injury is important in the long-term wellness of the patient. 

Studies have shown that patients undergoing TDM and who were adherent to medication protocol experienced fewer adverse effects, improved their ability to meet their own daily needs, and lowered overall medical costs as a result of fewer hospital admissions. 

The problem is that as medical practices grow, the ability to track a patient’s needs during TDM can become convoluted. Providers and medical staff must check when each patient’s labs are completed, document the results, communicate the need for medication changes to the patient, and repeat these steps for every designated time period. What would be the best practice for tracking TDM patients? And communicating with them about their missed appointments or the dangers associated with missing TDM steps such as laboratory work or patient assessments? The ramifications of non-adherence to medications coupled with the endless possibilities of communication errors can result in an increased risk of patient injury or even death. Some long-term effects of unmonitored medications can result in cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, thyroid disease, liver disease, and other chronic or life-threatening conditions. 

An easier way to communicate and track patient needs


At pMD, we are dedicated to making life easier for providers and patients alike by helping decrease communication errors, increase adherence, and improve patient outcomes. For each new customer, pMD takes the needs of the practice to heart and has the ability to build out custom fields for patient populations such as those who may require therapeutic drug monitoring, for example. In addition to this simplified way of keeping track of patient needs, pMD offers HIPAA-compliant communication with patients. While therapeutic drug monitoring may be associated with certain patient populations, pMD is dedicated to helping a variety of different patient populations and specialties.

 
To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrybilling servicestelehealthsecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.
Physicians


You’ve made your way to the physician’s corner of the pMD blog, welcome! Here you’ll find information written for physicians, by physicians. 

This post is written by Richard E. Lehman, MD, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.

Last year, the world was rocked in ways that no one could have predicted or even imagined. With 2020 and more than half of 2021 behind us, and as the world adapts to a new normal, what does this post-COVID environment look like for physicians, practices, and patients? In this blog post, we’ll take a look at the good, the bad, and the interesting in relation to the impacts of the pandemic on medical practices and their patients, as well as what to expect moving forward.

THE GOOD


Prior to the start of the pandemic, the use of telemedicine was somewhat of a novelty. Some practices began tinkering with this technology for their chronically ill or remote patient populations. As the spread of the virus started gaining speed, practices soon found themselves deep in the throes of figuring out how to integrate video visits into their daily routine and how to help patients through one of the worst global medical crises in recent history. The increased use of telemedicine brought to light the benefits of incorporating technology into patient care, providing flexibility and accessibility to patients who need it most. It also showed us that its success and continued use are largely dependent on an appropriate reimbursement model. Without it, practices may be less incentivized to adopt telemedicine or are likely to face financial challenges. I would hope to see and anticipate seeing some practices adapt to a hybrid model that incorporates both telehealth and in-person visits, barring any reimbursement policy changes. There are still some aspects of medicine that require face-to-face care with a provider but for those less complex scenarios, why not give the patient (and practice) a choice?

THE BAD


In an era where data is more accessible than ever, misinformation is simultaneously on the rise and finding its way into the general public. As a result, we saw more and more hesitation around believing the data and science presented about COVID-19 and mitigating its spread. People tend to forget that science evolves and adjusts as more data is collected. However, the public is constantly being bombarded with quick one-liners and sensational headlines in the media, many of which are inaccurate statements. This mistrust permeated throughout the country and, in my opinion, has been devastating to the medical community. With the rapid vaccine deployment, it's understandable that patients have questions regarding the effectiveness and potential unknown side effects. Over time, with more data, we’ll be able to paint a better and more clear picture to patients surrounding the vaccine. It's our job as physicians to answer questions and help them make informed decisions based on their medical history. 

So, what does this mean for health care moving forward? It means that medicine is now even more having to compete with the media and navigate that influence on their patients. Providers are not only health care professionals but are also now having to manage public health and society concerns. However, while we all have differing opinions about what to do and how to cope in certain situations, I believe providers need to elevate their approach towards a more open and transparent environment with patients, allowing for more engagement and helping prevent patients from finding other, less reliable sources of information surrounding their care. We should embrace the questions and not shut people down when questioning what they believe to be fact. The COVID crisis is under the microscope, so being open to conversation and providing thoughtful explanations can provide a stable foundation with patients. 

Health care is changing as rapidly as the world and we should take away from this recent pandemic lessons in not only handling future outbreaks but also handling patient trust where trust has been lost. The bottom line is that how we collect data and release that information needs to improve. For example, how many people test positive for COVID-19 doesn’t tell the same story as to how many of those patients are severely ill, hospitalized, and/or need a ventilator. The foreseeable future holds residual pandemic effects, and providers will be expected to work even harder to regain patient trust.

THE INTERESTING


While many of the impacts of the pandemic are fairly obvious or have been discussed at length for the past year and a half, there are also plenty of areas of medicine that have seen a ripple effect and are likely to change moving forward. As a pediatric physician, an interesting event that resulted from 2020’s lockdowns was the decrease in child immunizations. According to a recent article in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, infants and toddlers up to age 2 years in Michigan have been falling behind on their immunizations, showing a decline in January 2020 through April 2020 compared to 2018 and 2019. Only the hepatitis B vaccine dose given at birth, typically in the hospital, did not decrease. This is just one example of the many impacts a pandemic can have on ancillary health care, which is just as important to recognize. Since many ancillary services in health care require in-person visits and render telehealth a suboptimal solution, providers are looking towards new strategies to maintain essential services.

It’s hard to imagine that the first half of 2021 sped by so quickly, considering everything we’d been through in 2020. As we navigate the good, the bad, and the interesting in relation to this pandemic, we can’t forget that COVID-19 will still continue to have a presence moving forward. A practice’s ability to adapt in the face of sudden change is essential for successful patient care and its survival as a business. We should continue to learn from one another and work through challenges together despite our differences in hopes to quickly combat any future outbreaks. 

Dr. Rick Lehman is a veteran critical care physician, providing care to pediatric patients across the country. He’s “grown-up” with the changes in health care over the last 20 years related software and has been directly involved with implementing new EMR systems at multiple hospitals, often transitioning them from paper to digital systems. His frustrations surrounding inefficient EMRs while managing his critical care patients have driven his passion for changing these health care systems to create better provider workflows.

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To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrybilling servicestelehealthsecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.
Vendors that are strategic partners

 

In this day and age, so much of what traditionally needed to be done in person can not only be done virtually but has become the standard in many cases. Whether it’s school, work, or even just catching up with family and friends, it seems like almost everything we can think of can be done remotely.

A generation made for telehealth


Although, as a society we’ve been slowly moving towards having more regular virtual interactions for a while, this phenomenon has been greatly accelerated by the recent pandemic, leading to an increase in the usage of telemedicine specifically. While this represented a monumental shift in how care is delivered, especially for older generations, it was far less of a foreign concept for Generation Z (Gen Z), who were essentially born with a smartphone in hand and have never known life without the internet. Gen Z, which are those born between 1995 and 2012, is expected to account for an estimated 61 million new employees in the global workforce in the next decade, and for them, Telehealth isn’t something they are hoping will just pass with the pandemic. 

Is the office visit dead?


Hold on, let’s not go that far! There are certainly plenty of instances where a telehealth visit with a doctor just won’t cut it. But, ask your average 18-25-year-old if they have a choice to physically go into a doctor's office or connect with them virtually, which would they choose? Chances are they won’t be so hesitant to take the virtual option. In fact, according to a recent study,  41% of Gen Z would actually prefer receiving their health care consultations digitally rather than in person, by far the most of any generation. At the end of the day, telemedicine provides both patients and providers increased flexibility and efficiency, both of which are coveted highly by Gen Z. 

What about privacy?


Since they’re already so used to having so many of their daily interactions online, Gen Z tends to hold a much different view about digital data privacy compared to older generations. When it comes to where they find and consume their information, a majority of Gen Z rely on a variety of different sources such as their cell phones, social media, and YouTube channels to stay informed on the subjects of interest to them. Most of these platforms require their users to share their personal information online, which is one of the main reasons why Gen Z feels more comfortable providing their data over the Internet. Because of this, many of the individuals from the younger generation seem to be much more willing to share their personal health information online compared to older generations if there is a clear benefit to them. With the increase in social distancing measures due to the pandemic and the ability to fit their consultation within their busy school schedules, the younger generation feels much more comfortable using telemedicine because it suits their personal lifestyles better.

Why should we continue to embrace telehealth?


At the end of the day, Gen Z value having access to everything they need right at their fingertips. By making it easier for them to seek medical advice through telemedicine, we can encourage more Gen-Zers to feel comfortable speaking up whenever they’re dealing with any health-related issues and encourage them to meet with medical professionals regularly. Even though more serious procedures may still require them to visit a doctor in person, there’s still a benefit in giving them the option to have their initial conversations virtually. Ultimately, it’ll be able to make their lives easier and make it more convenient for them to seek medical attention when needed.

If you are interested in learning more about pMD’s telehealth tools and services, please contact us here or give us a call at 800-587-4989 x2. We’d love to hear from you!

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The Case for Mobile Based Telehealth
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Measuring the Impact of Telehealth: What to Measure, Why & How


To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registry, billing services, telehealth, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.

 


Doctors spend so much of their time on the go, moving from place to place caring for patients. They see twenty patients per day on average, spending most of their extra time doing paperwork. We’ve talked a lot about efficiency as it relates to using technology to reduce administrative burden and complexity, to make time for what really matters most — your patients. But how can you make sure that the time spent with patients is being used to its full advantage? This is where effective communication is essential.



The Very Different Impressions of Doctor-Patient Communication


Studies have shown that medical professionals often overestimate their abilities to convey information clearly. The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery surveyed orthopedic surgeons after they met with patients, and while 75% of them believed they had communicated satisfactorily, when their patients were asked how they’d done, only 21% reported that their doctors had communicated well with them. That’s quite a significant delta and shows that two people can very often leave a conversation with completely different impressions of how it went.


There are a few reasons this can happen. Aside from potentially being in a hurry, dealing with as many patients as they do, physician burnout can lead to an increased detachment, which may cause doctors to misinterpret cues. It can be easy to stop treating patients as individuals with different needs and styles of communication.



Views on the Importance of Honest Communication Have Changed


While for much of the 20th century it was a common belief that giving patients hope and keeping them happy was more important than honesty, the modern schools of thought disagree completely. Patients who trust their doctors are more likely to follow their instructions, as well as provide them with the information they need to make an accurate diagnosis or treatment plan. Likewise, it is now understood that having a sense of understanding and control of your circumstances is much more beneficial to a patient than simply being comforted. 


Patients are more educated than ever before, and due to the ease and convenience of the Internet, they have resources at their disposal to form opinions and questions about their own health care. To get the most out of the time spent with patients, it’s imperative to treat the interaction as a mutually beneficial relationship.



Solutions for Improving Communication with Patients


Some proposed solutions include AIDET® Five Fundamentals of Patient Communication and The RESPECT Model. While slightly different approaches, they both have the same goal: ensuring that physicians are using the best communication skills they have at their disposal and fostering a sense of trust with their patients. It’s important to remember that each patient is an individual with their own set of needs that must be acknowledged and addressed.


If you are interested in learning more about pMD’s HIPAA-compliant secure communication and telehealth tools, please contact us here or give us a call at 800-587-4989 x2. We’d love to hear from you!


 

To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registry, billing services, telehealthsecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.

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Patient Communication Tools for Better Patient Care
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Physician Burnout & How pMD Can Help

Can you recall the glorious feeling of getting immersed in the groove of an extra productive working session, or reading the best book that you just can’t put down, only to glance up for a quick second to check the clock and realize you're 20 minutes late for your next meeting, or dinner, or an appointment?

Generally, outside of the unpleasant initial shock of realizing how much time has passed in your trance, the effects of being late are usually minimal and easily remedied. 

But this isn’t always the case with certain commitments. Take doctor’s appointments, for example. Missing an appointment can not only mean that you have to wait another week or two to see your health care provider, but it can also result in dreaded no-show fees. With many in-person appointments being moved to telehealth visits, it can be even more difficult to make sure you’re on-time for your medical appointments when you’re not physically having to go into a doctor's office.

In my personal experience, my health care providers have used telemedicine systems that require me to log into a website or keep track of a link sent days in advance that I would have to click on at the time of my visit. There have been plenty of times I’ve looked up at the clock and realized I’m 15 minutes late to a telehealth visit and have to scramble quickly to find my login or video link, all while keeping my fingers crossed that I don’t get a no-show fee or have to reschedule. Even if I do make it to my appointment on time, I find that my internet connection might not be the best at my house, or the camera on my computer doesn’t always have the quality I’d like. 

With pMD’s telehealth solution, our team designed our product a little differently with patients and ease-of-use as top of mind. There’s no need to log into a website or search emails for a link that may have been sent days in advance. Our mobile app is easy to download on the patient’s phone, just like any other app, except that it’s encrypted, secure, and HIPAA-compliant. At the time of the appointment, the provider initiates a call to the patient through the secure app and the call rings directly to the patient's mobile phone - allowing the patient to use either wifi or cellular data for the best connection and video quality. So regardless of what patients are up to at the time, they’ll be notified right away of their appointment. pMD does all this while continuing to protect providers' privacy by not displaying their personal information. 

After the video appointment is complete, pMD also provides patients and providers a way to securely communicate via our chat feature, keeping the provider in control of how long the line of communication stays open. So say a patient has received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and you want to make sure they don’t forget to receive the second dose. The practice can message them directly via the pMD mobile app, or better yet, set up an automated reminder, to remind the patient when it’s time to receive the second dose. By downloading a mobile app on their phone, patients not only have a secure and virtual way to carry out their appointment but they also have a more direct way of receiving important information from their providers about their health or updates from the practice. 

At pMD, we love providing a robust and seamless telemedicine solution that provides patients and practices with intuitive tools to better communicate about patient care. Submit your information here if you’d like to learn more about how pMD’s telehealth solution could benefit your practice.

To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrysecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.


Being more than just a public health issue, the pandemic has drastically changed our way of life - the way we work, learn, socially interact, and especially how health care is practiced and delivered. For most health care organizations, this event has been a shock, not to mention an unexpected spike in demand for virtual care.  With the massive response to the pandemic, of the groups who weren't already utilizing this technology, many had to rush to incorporate services to keep up with the growing demand of patients needing care from afar.  It has forced telehealth to the forefront, now proven to provide quality care virtually. Whether it’s a phone call, video, or messaging, telehealth can come in many forms that can cover a variety of mediums.

In a new survey conducted in October of 2020, the COVID-19 Healthcare Coalition Telehealth Workgroup found that more than 75% of the almost 1600 physicians polled said that “ telehealth has allowed them to provide quality care for a variety of specialties, from COVID-19-related care to behavioral health.”

Importance of Accurately Measuring Impact & Success of Telehealth

Unsurprisingly, telehealth has become a lifeline for both patients and providers alike. But with any new service or technology, it’s extremely important to measure both effectiveness and satisfaction, all the while making it accessible, time and cost-efficient, and compliant under federal regulations relating to patient care during COVID-19. A practice also needs to evaluate the impact telehealth might have. They need to understand the nature of these services, assess the needs of patients, and collect and analyze measures relevant to accurately measure the success of telehealth medicine. 

Measuring, Tracking & Reporting on Telehealth Services

If a practice can optimize their systems to expand both the use of telehealth and their ability to measure, track, and report on the quality of telehealth, it could change the outcome of care for many patients. So how would a patient or a provider make sure they are using telehealth correctly and efficiently? These questions can be sought through a framework of measurable data identifying the level of accessibility, financial impacts, user experience, and effectiveness of a system. 

How to Measure the Quality of Telehealth Services

A great way to collect metrics is through the use of pre- and post-telehealth visit surveys for both patient and provider, and also Electronic Clinical Quality Measures (eCQM).  eCQMs are measures specified in a standard electronic format that use data exported from electronic health records (EHR) and/or health (IT) systems to measure the quality of health care provided. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) use eCQMs in a variety of quality reporting and value-based purchasing programs. Each eCQM is documented in a special way defining its intent, populations included, logic, data elements, and value set identifiers. 

CMS, required by federal law,  provides a quality incentive program, rewarding providers one of two ways, one being a merit-based incentive payment system (MIPS) and another through Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APMs).

pMD Platform Provides the Perfect Solution

In light of this year’s unparalleled events, telehealth is being pushed more now than ever, but with so many variables and deterrents, how does one solve problems and address barriers relating to virtual care? The pMD platform offers a great solution to meet CMS MIPS requirements with our point-of-care data capture which provides a robust dashboard to monitor performance metrics and offers real-time data for reporting purposes. Having the ability to enter these eCQMs at the point of care can help providers focus more on patients. Rather than spending hours on paperwork, providers can save time, improve on and assess the quality of treatment, and foster a goal of access-driven real-time data to help decrease medical errors.  When a provider seeks out a telehealth solution, it’s a no-brainer that pMD is a perfect solution, not just for now but for the future of patient care.


Related articles:
Telehealth Workflow: Best Practices for Building a Long-Term Workflow
MIPS 2020: What’s New
Investing in Partnerships Pays Dividends

 

To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrysecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.

Proof of vaccination

Amid this pandemic, vaccines are a topic that is at the forefront of health conversations and news. Everyone is looking forward to the day that a COVID-19 vaccine is available to help us start returning to “normal”. However, there’s another aspect that perhaps only some have considered: proof of having received the COVID-19 vaccination.

2021 May Be the Year More People Need Proof of Vaccination

Typically, the only situations requiring vaccination records are grade school and summer camp attendance, being a member of a sports team, military enlistment/deployment, and employment in the health and safety industries. However, 2021 could be the first year where average people need a way of presenting proof of vaccination in situations ranging from attending a game at a sports venue to boarding an airplane. There is even historical precedent of the U.S. government mandating vaccinations. Even employers have the legal right to enforce vaccination requirements for their employees. It’s not farfetched to imagine a future where employers make proof of COVID-19 vaccination a condition of new or even continued employment.

Empowering Patients with Easily Accessible Vaccination Records

This possibility fits neatly into the health care industry’s trend of encouraging patients to take a more active role in their own health care. One way patients can take a step towards that goal is to know if they are up-to-date on their vaccines and maintain an easily accessible vaccination record. The CDC’s vaccination schedule for adults is more involved than most would think, e.g. specifying repeated doses of vaccines like TDAP every 10 years. Personally, I would like to know I’m up-to-date on my vaccines without having to sift through old paper records or contact multiple health care providers such as pharmacies and general practitioners. 

Electronic Records a Better Solution than Paper-Based

Even in this day and age of technology, one of the CDC’s official recommendations for recording your vaccinations is to use this PDF. You’re instructed to print it out, take it with you every time you are vaccinated and have your provider fill it out. This inherently comes with all the downsides of a paper-based solution, ranging from the potential for human error when recording the information to damage or loss of the entire record itself. The vast majority of health care providers have incorporated some form of electronic health system for storing patient data, often with a patient portal. This gives patients the means to more easily access or even download copies of their health records. These copies can then be viewed at any time by using cloud storage solutions such as Dropbox or Apple’s iCloud Drive, which allow access to those files from whatever device is on hand. 

pMD Makes Requesting & Receiving Records Easy for Patient & Provider

pMD already has the capability to assist patients with retrieving their vaccination and health records. Patients can securely message their practice from the app and request for their records. Practices can then directly send health records to their patients in a HIPAA-compliant manner using the attachments feature in our patient messaging platform. Even obtaining access to the patient portal of providers’ electronic health record systems can be simplified through pMD via chat communication, allowing login information to be shared securely. With such an easy tool available to get a handle on your vaccination and health records, why not start today?

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To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrysecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.

HIPAA-compliant tool

As the world continues to adapt to the changes brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the health care industry has ridden waves of changes brought on by “the new normal.” The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services acted quickly to remove barriers to providing the best care possible to patients by announcing that the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) would not penalize the use of video conferencing tools that are not HIPAA-compliant during the pandemic. This notification went on to suggest that providers seek out HIPAA-compliant video communication products whenever possible, but the lifted restriction allowed providers to care for their patients utilizing their best judgment without red tape restricting their ability to improve patients’ lives. 

However, now that we are seven months into the pandemic, one of the questions I have been hearing more and more often is: “What makes pMD’s telehealth video platform HIPAA-compliant?”

Let’s get technical: HIPAA compliant video conferencing rules

While the Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA) policy has several goals, the one that applies to video conferencing is to respect individuals' rights to privacy by requiring secure handling of individuals’ health data. Covered entities, such as health care providers, insurance providers, and clearinghouses, in addition to business associates, or another company that conducts business with a covered entity and comes into contact with patient information, are subject to the HIPAA legislation. 

Two major sections of the HIPAA legislation are The Privacy Rule and The Security Rule. The Privacy Rule covers the patients’ rights to privacy and appropriate processes for using and sharing PHI, or Protected Health Information, no matter the medium used. The Security Rule sets standards for electronic storage and transfer of PHI. These standards within The Security Rule include administrative actions, physical safeguards, and technical standards.

How pMD video chat meets HIPAA-compliance requirements

pMD’s telehealth video chat functionality (as well as all our other software products) meets the requirements set forth by the HIPAA legislation. We execute Business Associate Agreements (BAA) with our customers in order to provide the assurance that we will handle our clients’ PHI with the utmost care, to disclose how we manage and process PHI, to outline how we will safeguard the data, and to determine how we will help our clients comply with the Privacy Rule.

In addition, pMD utilizes the highest encryption standards across the industry in order to protect our customers. While other vendors shy away from storing clinical information and, in some cases, even advertise that they will not store any information on your behalf, pMD understands the clinical importance of having a fully integrated solution for telemedicine and instead builds robust technical systems to manage your patients’ health information.

pMD also understands that HIPAA-compliance is not necessarily enough to protect PHI, so we consistently go above and beyond the security measures required by legislation to ensure we serve as a trustworthy and reliable partner for our customers. Each year, pMD undergoes rigorous voluntary security audits to confirm that we meet the industry’s best practices.

Make the best telehealth decision for your practice

While pMD has taken strong steps on the security front, this is still only one of the critical factors that should go into evaluating telehealth vendors. pMD’s extraordinary customer service, our collaborative approach to implementing the best telehealth workflow regardless of your organization’s size, and the intense focus we place on the pMD user experience set us apart from the competition. All of this is backed by the organization you know and trust: a 20+ year player in the health care industry with thousands of happy customersIf you’d like to learn more about our telehealth solutions, contact us.

Related articles:
https://www.pmd.com/blog/post/your-future-revealed-telehealth-with-pmd
https://www.pmd.com/blog/post/supporting-patients-one-video-call-at-a-time
https://www.pmd.com/blog/post/pmd-the-most-valuable-player-in-telehealth
https://www.pmd.com/blog/post/pmd-helping-practices-and-patients-navigate-telehealth-when-they-need-it-most


To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrysecure messagingteam and pro communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.


As a member of pMD’s sales team, I have the distinct pleasure of speaking to a large number of individuals in the health care industry that are seeking better, more intuitive methods of communication amongst their internal team and with their patients. Most of the time, this outreach on behalf of the prospective client is done with this sole purpose in mind. However, these individuals are mostly surprised at the level of functionality and the communications risks that they can mitigate with a more robust health care communication solution product, like pMD,  that actually serves multiple purposes other than securely texting.

Today's world is a busy place and a premium is placed on our time. Efficiency is at the forefront of the majority of people's minds and any step we can take to make better use of our time is a must. Health care providers are often at the extreme end of this lifestyle. There is a lot to do, a lot of people depending on you and often there is not enough time in the day. 

Having a consolidated means of communicating with your team and managing your day can be a great time saver and allow for accurate and transparent communication amongst a care team. This is a reality for most of us in our personal lives. At this point in America, most of us have a smartphone that keeps us connected with the ones we love and a calendar to keep us focused on our day. However, in our professional lives, we are relegated to a team calendar in one location, printing our rounding or patient list from another, and sending vague, often cryptic text messages to our colleagues or office staff to communicate any number of items dealing with a patient's care. We have all done it and are equally guilty. It's the world we live in.

pMD Pro the Solution to Managing Healthcare Communication & More

pMD recognized this need to have patient, schedule, and communication management in one location and made it a reality in our pMD® Pro solution. Now, providers and their support staff have the ability to manage their rounding list, view their appointment schedule, and communicate contextually with their colleagues. Taking one step further, providers now have the ability to enter a shared clinical note for a patient on their rounding list. Since this is a shared note, all providers in the practice are able to view this note as well as make additional entries in the event of weekend on-call or cross-coverage. 

Private, Secure Communication Outside of Your Practice

All of this is very helpful and efficient being in one location, however, in today's world, the need to communicate securely goes outside the confines of our practices and colleagues. Due to the rise of COVID-19, the world has seen a drastic shift in many industries and health care businesses have been uniquely challenged because, pandemic or not, people still get sick and need to see their provider.  This has pushed telehealth from a minimally utilized novelty to an imperative must-have in providing care to our population. This brings to mind several questions: How do I do this securely? How do I keep my personal contact information private? What is the learning curve and success rate for my elderly population going to be?

All of these questions are valid and deserve to be addressed. Using pMD’s health care communication solution, the ability to communicate securely through chat, voice calls, and video calls is not limited to only members of your business. All of these methods of communication can be utilized with patients in a controlled fashion that does not expose your personal information as a provider. pMD’s solution from a patient's perspective is intuitive and simple. This is why it has been so effective for our current customers who have already deployed pMD telehealth to their patient population. If your patient has ever sent a text or received a FaceTime call from a friend or loved one, then they will be immediately successful in completing their virtual appointment with you.

Efficient, Automated Appointment Reminders

To bring the communication loop full circle, automated appointment reminders have been developed and put into place to confirm with patients in advance and drive adherence to appointment times. These reminders, once put into place, are automated and allow patients to confirm or cancel their appointment well in advance of the scheduled date. Having a confirmed cancellation gives the practice more time to either fill that open time slot or give the provider time back into their day, reducing wasted time. After all, efficiency with our time and diverting that newfound time towards more important tasks (like providing the best possible patient care) is the goal, right?


To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrysecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.

Improved medical billing and payment system boosts patient satisfaction

Everyone who has received medical care in the U.S. has experienced the complex system built around paying for the care you receive. From complicated insurance types to delayed and unforeseen bills, many agree that the financial burdens that come from U.S. health care are the toughest to swallow. The system, in all its complexity, is difficult for a reason. The negotiations that take place between insurance carriers and medical billing teams determine the amount that each patient has to pay on a case-by-case basis. The limited forms of payment exist for the security of the patient and the protection of their private health information. But is there a way to improve the patient experience when it comes to paying for medical care?

Providing Patients Cost Estimates & Easy Way to Pay for Medical Care

In 2018, in a survey conducted by HIMSS Analytics, researchers found that 68% of patients would be more likely to return to a practice for future care if a cost estimate was available to them at the time of service. It was also found that 75% of patients wished they could keep a credit card on file for any balances that come up during their care. Simple fixes go a long way towards improving patient retention and driving practice growth. The easier you make it for your patients to pay for their care, the more money you are likely to receive.

Benefits of Providing Patient Care Cost Estimates

Cost estimates of patient care are one of the largest things a practice can do to make patients feel more financially comfortable while navigating their episode of care. An unforeseen bill, or one that is larger than expected, can unsettle a patient and may lead to higher rates of uncollected revenue. Upfront estimates provide peace of mind and allow patients to make informed decisions about the care they are receiving. The HIMSS Analytics survey found that 46% of patients also said they would be more likely to pay a significant portion of their bill upfront if an estimate were available. This simple step can create massive benefits for both practice and patient by keeping all parties informed and engaged throughout all aspects of care.

Patients Prefer Modern Medical Billing & Payment Solutions

The growth of consumer culture in health care also means patients want to be able to pay for their visits using modern solutions. Scheduling apps and HIPAA-compliant payment portals are growing in popularity and patients are responding positively. By allowing patients to pay online, not only is the patient experience improved, but the providers will receive reimbursement for their work faster than paper billing alternatives. A 2016 survey by Aite Group shows that 56% of all bills that year were paid online, while 77% of health care practices specifically use paper billing systems. This comparison shows that the needs of the 50% of patients that state they would prefer online or paperless medical billing are not being properly addressed by their health care providers.

pMD Charge Capture the First Step

Tools like pMD® Charge Capture™ allow providers to capture their charges in real-time and reduce billing lag. These workflow improvements are the first step to providing patients with quick and accurate estimates of the money they owe and create more actionable opportunities for providers to maximize their revenue while driving patient growth. It all stems from the patient experience.

Related Articles:
What to Look For When Evaluating Charge Capture: Charge Lag Statistics
Health Care Communication: Electronic Vs. Paper Follow Up for Millennials


To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrysecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.