The pMD Blog

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pMD Blog...

where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


The goal of hospitals should be to always provide patients with a positive experience. New research by Press Ganey found that while common themes run through the experiences of happy patients, there is much more variation when it comes to the experiences of unhappy patients. The findings demonstrate that preventing negative experiences requires the same kind of vigilance needed to prevent the vast range of potential safety problems.  Read More

Over the last few years, there has been an estimated 20 percent increase in hospitals and health systems considering physicians as candidates in their CEO searches. It’s become apparent that physicians with the right training and experience could learn a lot about hospital operations and bring with them the much-needed clinical and front-line experience.  Read More

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth was more of a novelty than a necessity. The concept of touching base with a doctor remotely was promising, but there were hurdles. Now, almost 90 percent of Americans want to continue using telehealth for non-urgent consultations after COVID-19 has passed.  Read More

• The Mayo Clinic has launched a new initiative to collect and analyze patient data from remote monitoring devices and diagnostic tools to accelerate diagnoses and disease prediction using artificial intelligence (AI). The platform will deliver clinical decision support tools, diagnostic insights, and care recommendations to help clinicians make faster and more accurate diagnoses.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, medical billing revenue cycle management, telehealthsecure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software.


Finances and the revenue cycle can be a high source of stress for providers, who let’s be honest, would much rather focus on patient care. However, effectively managing a practice's revenue is crucial to actually being able to continue to provide that care. One of the most unpredictable phases of the revenue cycle is collecting patient responsibility, which often results from the high variance in payment methods as well as hesitation to pay due to a lack of understanding of insurance systems. Simply put, many patients don’t know what they owe and why.

WHY IS COLLECTING PATIENT PAYMENTS SO HARD?

According to the American Association of Family Physicians, only 14% of adults understand key components of their insurance plans. This confusion and uncertainty can often make it difficult to determine a patient’s financial responsibility at the time of a visit, leading to even more frustration when they get a bill in the mail months later that they don’t understand. Estimation tools and insurance cards can help ease this uncertainty or to point a practice in the right direction, but ultimately most patients end up in the dark when it comes to what they will owe in the end. 

Traditionally, many practices end up providing services for free, collecting a small insurance co-pay, or sometimes not even that, and then opting to bill the patient later, after collecting from insurance first. The problem is the process of settling with and collecting from insurance companies can take days, weeks, or even months and by that time patients are far less likely to pay for bills they receive long after services rendered. In fact, more than 60% of patients surveyed by InstaMed reported they would “consider switching providers for a better healthcare payment experience,” which includes upfront patient responsibility, eligibility, and the ability to pay with their preferred payment methods. 

With this in mind, it’s hard to believe less than 25% of physician practices have an eligibility and estimation tool in place to assist their practices in maximizing revenue, according to Healthcare Finance News.  By providing real-time patient responsibility estimates, providers can increase patient confidence and are more likely to collect the full amount they are owed for their services. Without an eligibility solution in place, practices could potentially be missing out on between 30-50% of their patient revenue. 

ADAPTING TO THE NEXT GENERATION OF PATIENTS

Speed and transparency make a huge difference when it comes to collecting patient payments. Giving your patients the tools to make the process as simple as possible is key to not only collecting but collecting quickly with high patient satisfaction. Many practices still rely on mailed statements and/or in-person payments, such as cash, check, or credit card, which can be a major hindrance, especially when it comes to younger generations. 

Gen Z, which are those born between 1995 and 2012, is expected to account for an estimated 61 million new employees in the global workforce in the next decade. Why is this important? Well, the majority of Gen Z have never lived without the internet, smartphones, and immediate access to information and products. With an influx of Gen Z patients, the expectation is that practices make it easy to receive and pay for care. If it’s not, they may seek care elsewhere. 

It’s much easier to collect payments when the patient is standing in front of you, but even if they’re not, the quicker a practice requests payment, the more likely patients are to pay it. Recent trends in expected payment options have shown nearly 50% of patients would prefer to pay their medical bills using contactless or paperless payment options. Practices using paper statements introduce significant lag into their collection systems by relying on mail carriers and printing/packing services. Recent improvements in payment processors and the technology they offer have made it possible to send statements and payment requests in real-time to speed up collections and boost patient satisfaction and confidence. 

EVERYTHING SHOULD BE IN ONE PLACE

The last part of the equation is making sure everyone in the practice is on the same page regarding patients’ financial status. The fewer systems involved, the less room for error and inefficiency. From patient intake to collecting payments, it’s important to be able to do everything in one place without having to log into multiple systems to piece together information.

 

If you are interested in learning more about pMD’s billing and revenue cycle management services, please contact us here or give us a call at 800-587-4989 x2. We’d love to hear from you!

 

To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registry, billing services, telehealthsecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


• As telehealth continues to play an important role in meeting the demands of patients and a strained health care workforce, it’s critical that providers get patients on board with using the technology for the long term. Its future adoption, however, heavily depends on the ability to support a trusting relationship between patients and physicians.  Read More

According to a new survey, slow prior authorization protocols directly contributed to care delivery delays and poor treatment outcomes for some patients during the surge in COVID-19 cases last winter. Nearly all physicians surveyed said they spent 16 hours on average seeking prior authorization for patient care, which delayed treatment.  Read More

CMS has begun recouping the accelerated and advance Medicare payments from providers who borrowed the emergency funds to battle COVID-19. During the recoupment period, CMS will hold back a portion of new Medicare claims from providers until the payments advanced last year are recouped. Providers are required to have paid back the advanced payments in full 20 months after they received the first payment. If they fail to do so, CMS will charge an interest of four percent on the remaining balance.  Read More

The pandemic has accelerated a growing desire among providers and even some medical technology manufacturers to acquire or get into the surgery center business, experts say. One of the biggest drivers of this shift has been eroding patient volumes at hospitals due to fears of contracting COVID-19.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, medical billing revenue cycle management, telehealthsecure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software.


Claim denied. Ugh! These are two words that make all those involved in the health care revenue cycle cringe. Unfortunately, claim denials are very common, costly, and time-consuming to correct. However, there are strategies to avoid them, with the potential to significantly increase your bottom line and decrease your revenue-related headaches. We’re going to talk about one of those strategies here — real-time eligibility. 

WHY ARE MY CLAIMS BEING DENIED?

Eligibility verification is one of the first phases in the revenue cycle and by far the most significant. Did you know eligibility issues are one of the top five reasons claims deny? In fact,  nearly 24% of claims submitted are denied for eligibility and registration issues, such as the patient not being eligible for medical benefits on the date of service, or having incorrect demographic information, like date of birth or a misspelled name. 

The eligibility verification process is directly linked to claim denials which can have a variety of unwanted consequences. This includes a hike in the number of days in A/R, an escalation in write-off rates, a standstill of cash flow, inflated costs to collect, and most importantly, delays in a patients' access to treatment. The process of verifying eligibility needs to be both efficient and accurate in order to determine the responsibilities of both the payer and the patient.

HOW DO I MAKE SURE MY CLAIMS AREN’T DENIED?

Most claim denials are avoidable, in fact, 90% of them could be avoided. Research also shows that of those denied claims, approximately 60% of claims are recoverable, meaning they can be corrected and resubmitted for reimbursement. 

This sounds pretty good, right? Well, the reality is that a whopping 65% of denied claims are never reworked, which translates to a huge loss in revenue. The remaining claims that are reworked can be a drain on resources when factoring in both time and overhead costs. The average cost to correct and resubmit a denied claim can range anywhere from $30 - $125 per claim.

By implementing the right tools and processes, such as checking real-time eligibility, the likelihood of having your claims denied decreases significantly. By simply using real-time eligibility tools, you’ll be able to increase the number of  “clean” or error-free claims submitted,  tackling a number of the top reasons claims are denied, such as eligibility, no authorization, or being covered by another insurance plan.

WHAT IS REAL-TIME ELIGIBILITY?

But what exactly is real-time eligibility, and how do I use it to my advantage?

Real-time eligibility is a software tool that allows medical staff to electronically confirm a patient’s insurance coverage by interfacing directly with the insurance carriers. This instant eligibility check provides an up-to-date overview of the patient’s coverage and plan benefits. Real-time eligibility can answer important questions such as if the insurance policy is active, the start and end dates of a policy, deductible amounts, copay coverage, and if prior authorization is required. Verification checks can be done at the time of the patient’s appointment, or even prior, which not only saves both the staff and patient time during check-in but also provides a clear understanding of both the provider and patients’ responsibilities.

Real-time eligibility benefits all those involved in the revenue cycle management process. For example, the amount of time staff spends checking and verifying a patient’s coverage is reduced significantly, as it eliminates back and forth phone calls, and the need to check multiple systems in order to verify coverage. Additionally, verifications are saved to the patient’s record, which provides an audit trail and proof of insurance coverage. Plus, it makes it much easier to submit clean, error-free claims, which facilitates faster payment and improves cash flow, which leads to increased provider satisfaction. Let’s not forget about the most important part of the revenue cycle, the patient. Being able to communicate to the patient their financial responsibility prior to, or at the time of service, makes for a much-improved patient experience.

Claim denials are preventable when identified and addressed early in the revenue cycle process. By implementing real-time eligibility, you can decrease the burden of claim denials, and in turn, enhance revenue, improve the overall patient experience, and let the provider focus on what matters most — patient care.

 

If you are interested in learning more about pMD’s billing and revenue cycle management services, please contact us here or give us a call at 800-587-4989 x2. We’d love to hear from you!

 

To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registry, billing services, telehealthsecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


Telehealth proved its mettle this past year. Now more hospitals and health systems are looking to expand their efforts beyond video visit-based virtual care, and push for expanded remote patient monitoring programs such as acute care at home. But some big questions still need ironing out, as regulations and reimbursement mechanisms are in major flux.  Read More

The industry-wide conversation around prior authorizations is both complicated and contentious. They are considered useful for preventing adverse health events but a headache for providers. In order to soothe the controversies around prior authorizations, payers and providers may turn to electronic prior authorizations for faster care delivery, lowered provider burden, and an overall better patient experience.  Read More

Telehealth use among surgeons for patient visits soared in the early months of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020. While rates of telehealth use have declined as in-person care has resumed, telehealth use remains substantially higher across all surgical specialties than it was prior to the pandemic according to a new study.  Read More

2020 offered a perfect storm for cybercriminals, with the number of ransomware attempts against the health care industry rising by 123%. Ransomware attacks cost the healthcare industry $20.8 billion in downtime last year, which is double the number from 2019. In addition, more than 18 million patient records were impacted by these ransomware attacks, a 470% increase from 2019.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, medical billing revenue cycle management, telehealthsecure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


One year ago, when the COVID-19 pandemic upended life as we know it, some revenue cycles were better positioned than others to deal with the demands of the emergency. Organizations that had revenue cycle analytics, denial management tools, employees working remotely, and automated check-in processes in place at the beginning of 2020 were perhaps better positioned than other organizations to manage the operational demands of the pandemic.  Read More

People on dialysis who contract COVID-19 are at far greater risk for serious illness and death, so now, dialysis centers will be getting thousands of COVID-19 vaccine doses to vaccinate their patients and employees. The doses will be provided directly to dialysis centers for patients who receive treatment at least three times a week.  Read More

According to a new Kaufman Hall analysis, nearly 40% of hospitals could operate in the red this year even if the vaccine rollout is smooth and COVID-19 hospitalizations decline. The analysis, conducted on behalf of the American Hospital Association (AHA), gives a glimpse of the lingering financial impact of the pandemic on hospitals.  Read More

CMS has opened applications for the second cohort of the Primary Care First (PCF) value-based payment model which seeks to drive down costs and increase the quality of care. the PCF model will explore if switching from fee-for-service to Medicare performance-based payments could increase the quality of care and reduce overall Medicare costs.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, medical billing revenue cycle management, telehealthsecure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software.


Welcome to the "Biller’s Corner" of the pMD blog, your trusted source for updates, tips, and tricks provided by seasoned medical billing and coding experts!

Medical coding is often a moving target, especially during a pandemic. But have no fear, we’re here to provide guidance on some recent coding updates you need to know about!

NEW COVID-19 VACCINATION CODE ALERT

Speaking of the pandemic, the AMA recently released the CPT® code 91303 for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease [COVID-19]) vaccine, DNA, spike protein, adenovirus type 26 (Ad26) vector, preservative-free, 5×1010 viral particles/0.5mL dosage, for intramuscular use.

Here’s what you need to know:


* This is the code used for the one-dose COVID-19 vaccine developed by Janssen Pharmaceutica, a division of Johnson & Johnson.


* It should be used in conjunction with the CPT code 0031A, Immunization administration by intramuscular injection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease [COVID-19]) vaccine, DNA, spike protein, adenovirus type 26 (Ad26) vector, preservative-free, 5×1010 viral particles/0.5mL dosage, single dose.


AMA PROVIDES ADDITIONAL CLARITY ON THE UPDATED E/M CODE SET

Another hot topic this year has been the significant updates to E/M office codes (99201-99215). The primary intention behind the changes is to reduce the administrative burden of unnecessary documentation, in turn, allowing for more time to interact with patients. While the intention is great, there has been a lot of confusion surrounding the revisions made to this code set, and many physicians have reported that the ambiguity of the new revisions is actually leading to additional time spent on documenting. This is obviously the opposite of what they were going for, so the AMA is acting on that feedback and has released the following revisions, retroactive to January 1, 2021.

TIME-BASED BILLING

For time-based billing, you should not account the following:


* Performance of other services when reported separately


* Travel time


* Teaching that is not required for the management of the specific patients' care


Also, remember Medicare and private payers’ policies can differ when it comes to reporting prolonged services for time-based billing. Although the AMA has established the CPT 99417,  Medicare has assigned a status indicator of “I” for this code which denotes the code as invalid. Instead, Medicare will accept HCPCS code G2212 when reporting 15 minutes of prolonged care, performed on the same encounter as E/M codes 99205 and 99215. When billing for either code, be sure that it is listed separately in addition to a level 5 office/outpatient E/M service.

MEDICAL DECISION MAKING

When it comes to medical decision making (MDM), you should account for tests that are analyzed as part of MDM and are not reported separately when interpreting the study. These may be counted as ordered or reviewed when selecting an MDM level.  When determining the complexity of problems and the number of problems addressed, also consider the following:


* If the presenting symptoms are likely to represent a highly morbid condition, this may “drive” MDM even when the ultimate diagnosis is not highly morbid. Multiple low severity conditions may equate to a higher risk level due to interaction.


* When determining data reviewed and analyzed, pulse oximetry is not considered a test.


* When considering data elements reviewed, a combination of three data elements can be counted by reporting a unique test ordered, plus a note reviewed and an independent historian. However, it does not require each item type or category to be represented.


* Ordering a test may include those considered, but not selected after shared decision making due to patient health risk or a discussion to forego further testing due to lack of medical necessity.


UNDERSTANDING THE KEY TERMINOLOGY

The AMA has also provided clearer instructions to interpret the definitions that make up the elements of MDM. Understanding the following terms as they are laid out by the AMA is crucial:


* Analyzed: Tests ordered are presumed to be analyzed when the results are reported. Therefore, when they are ordered during an encounter, they are counted in that encounter. Tests that are ordered outside of an encounter may be counted in the encounter in which they are analyzed.


* Discussion:  Discussion requires an interactive exchange. The exchange must be direct and not through intermediaries (eg, clinical staff or trainees). The discussion can be asynchronous and occur on a later date following the encounter but must be completed within a short time period (eg, within a day or two).


* Independent Historian: When collecting the history, it does not need to be obtained in person but does need to be obtained directly from the historian providing the information.


* Risk: The term “risk” as used in these definitions relates to risk from the condition. While condition risk and management risk may often correlate, the risk from the condition is distinct from the risk of the management.


* Surgery (minor or major): The classification of surgery into minor or major is based on the common meaning of such terms when used by trained clinicians, similar to the use of the term “risk.” These terms are not defined by a surgical package classification. Be advised that CPT guidelines indicate that it is the provider's clinical determination whether surgery is considered major or minor and is not dictated by global days. However, if the surgery occurs in an office setting, you will have a hard time justifying it as a major surgery. Major surgeries will most often require the use of an operating room.


* Surgery (elective or emergency): Elective procedures and emergent or urgent procedures describe the timing of a procedure as it relates to the patient’s condition. An elective procedure is typically planned in advance and scheduled, while an emergent procedure is typically performed immediately or with minimal delay to allow for patient stabilization. Both elective and emergent procedures may be minor or major procedures. 


* Surgery (risk factors): Risk factors are those that are relevant to the patient and procedure. Evidence-based risk calculators may be used, but are not required, in assessing patient and procedure risk.


A full list of revisions can be found on the AMA website. Plus, be on the lookout for even more revisions that will become effective in 2023. 

Make sure to check back in soon for more billing and coding updates! And if you are interested in learning more about pMD’s billing and revenue cycle management services, please contact us here or give us a call at 800-587-4989 x2. We’d love to hear from you! 


To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registry, billing services, telehealthsecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.



Here's The Latest in Health Care:


U.S. vaccination efforts have gotten a big boost, thanks to increased supply. As of Wednesday, 147 million COVID-19 vaccination shots had been delivered, with roughly 39 million people, or 8 percent of the population, having been fully vaccinated. By the end of March, the number of shots produced is expected to be at least 200 million, and by summer it is expected to hit 700 million, according to HHS.  Read More

Many of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s value-based care payment models are currently undergoing a review. CMS quietly updated and delayed several payment models, including pulling a controversial model that ties payments to geographic health outcomes.  Read More

New research has revealed that staggering numbers of health care workers, more than one in five, have experienced anxiety, depression, or post-traumatic stress disorder during the pandemic. While North America ranked the lowest of all regions, it still saw nearly 15 percent of health care workers experiencing anxiety and close to 20 percent experiencing depression.  Read More

In 2020, at least 600 clinics, hospitals, and health care organizations were hit with ransomware attacks. These attacks affected more than 18 million patient records, and cost almost $21 billion in lawsuits, ransom paid, lost revenue, fees to rebuild lost data and more. Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, medical billing revenue cycle management, telehealthsecure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software.


You’ve made your way to the physician’s corner of the pMD blog, welcome! Here you’ll find information written for physicians, by physicians. 

This post is written by Richard E Lehman, MD, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

Ask any physician why they started practicing medicine; I promise you’ll never get the answer “because I love billing and documentation.” That being said, there’s really no way out of it as it’s part of the business of medicine.  It’s an essential part of the job we all have to deal with on a daily basis, but the more you know and understand about what goes on behind the scenes, the better off you are and the easier it is to do. Unfortunately, many physician’s billing questions often go unanswered or are told “if it isn’t broken, don’t fix it.”  Some just do the bare minimum to get by and are fine with the reimbursement, others question the whole system and what we can do to improve it.

Full disclosure, I’m not a biller. I am, however, a pediatric critical care physician who has spent over 20 years asking a lot of questions and identifying ways to minimize my administrative and clerical burdens, while still maximizing potential revenues. I’m here to pass on some of that knowledge and provide answers to a few questions commonly asked by physicians regarding billing and documentation I've heard over the years.

WHAT IS THE FINANCIAL IMPACT OF DIAGNOSIS CODES?

I hear providers asking this question a lot. Will my reimbursement change based on the number of diagnoses codes I use, and if so, how much will it increase per diagnosis? The short answer is no, the number of diagnosis codes won’t change the amount paid for a procedure. But this doesn’t quite tell the whole story. The natural follow-up question from providers is often “then can I save myself some time and only put one diagnosis code?” I asked this same question myself and have been told it’s not a great idea. If we routinely underreport diagnoses, we could find ourselves in some trouble with Medicaid payers if we get audited.  If payers are receiving some bundle of payment from the government based on the patient’s risk profile and they then under-report risk based on our under-reported diagnoses, it can result in hefty fines. So, although it may take a little bit of extra time, it’s usually a best practice to report dx codes accurately, with the most predominant one, typically most severe, first.

WILL I MAKE MORE MONEY THE QUICKER I DO MY BILLING?

This is a really interesting question. Will you actually make more money if a bill is submitted and processed today, versus days or weeks later? Well, one smart director of coding explained it simply, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush…or so the saying goes. When it comes down to it, the longer it takes to collect, the less the money is worth. While we’ll normally get paid the same per our contracts as long as we file within the claims time limit, which can range from 60-365 days depending on the payer, at the end of the day the money is worth more the longer we have it in our pocket. So, ultimately the quicker you can get your billing submitted and processed, the quicker claims can be collected, and the more the money could potentially be worth.

WHAT ARE THE MOST COMMON DOCUMENTATION MISTAKES THAT AFFECT REVENUE?

Although time-consuming, poor documentation can significantly impact reimbursement amounts. Avoiding some common documentation mistakes can mean the difference between a claim being rejected or achieving maximal reimbursement. For example, failing to completely describe an assessment and plan, can derail a claim. Physicians sometimes assume an auditor can review lab values and understand what they were trying to do. They can’t. Since they’re not physicians, they’re not allowed to make those assumptions. If you’re looking for your maximum reimbursement, it’s important to include what diagnostic values were run and how they factor into your decision making. Document what you were thinking, what you reviewed, and what you plan to do about it. While not an exhaustive list by any means, other common documentation mistakes that can lead to missed revenue include:

* Using an incorrect date of service, which tends to happen when notes are retroactively created late


* Failing to include total time spent for a time-based service


* A sparse history and exam or exam template that wasn’t individualized and conflicts with other areas of the medical record


* Failing to sign a note, although this has become far less common these days


* Providing an incomplete sedation record


Overall, when it comes to maximizing your revenue there’s a ton of variance in best practices depending on your specialty, state, payer contracts, etc. I encourage everyone to ask questions and keep yourself informed as much as possible.

If you are interested in learning more about pMD’s billing and revenue cycle management services, please contact us here or give us a call at 800-587-4989 x2. We’d love to hear from you!

Dr. Rick Lehman is a veteran critical care physician, providing care to pediatric patients across the country. He’s “grown-up” with the changes in health care over the last 20 years related software and has been directly involved with implementing new EMR systems at multiple hospitals, often transitioning them from paper to digital systems. His frustrations surrounding inefficient EMRs while managing his critical care patients have driven his passion for changing these health care systems to create better provider workflows.

 

To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registry, billing services, telehealthsecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.


Source: Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


Physician reimbursement for services performed by a doctor working for a hospital or health system is significantly higher than that paid to independent physicians for the same services. According to a new study, Medicare physician reimbursement would have been $114K higher per physician a year if the doctor was integrated with a hospital system.  Read More

Cybercriminals continue to see health care as one of the biggest, most lucrative targets for attacks. According to The National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), the exponential growth of the digital transformation of health care makes cybersecurity more important than ever and organizations should act now to protect patient data by replacing outdated software and instituting cybersecurity training and drills.  Read More

Over the next decade, Gen Z is expected to account for an estimated 61 million new employees in the global workforce, the majority of whom have never lived without the internet, smartphones, and immediate access to information and products. This is leading organizations to significantly adapt to new digital preferences and patient experiences.   Read More

The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) and the American Board of Telehealth (ABT) are partnering to expand access to training and education for virtual care. The partnership comes on the heels of the ABT's recently launched CORE Concepts in Telehealth Certificate, which consists of seven telemedicine-focused training models. As part of the collaboration, members of the ATA will receive discounted access to the ABT's certificate programs.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, medical billing revenue cycle management, telehealthsecure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software.