The pMD Blog

Welcome to the
pMD Blog...

where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.



Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Health care spending has slowed down for the second year in a row. The lower rate can be attributed to a slower growth in hospital services, clinics, and physician offices, which make up 63% of health care spending, according to the Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.  Read More

•  The USDA is easing up on the nutrition rules for school lunches. While the lunches are healthier than they were 5 years ago, schools need to have a little more flexibility in serving meals that kids would actually eat in order to avoid wasting food. The new rule gives administrators more leeway in serving non whole grain-rich breads and pastas, which is currently a requirement unless a waiver is in place.  Read More

•  Two rideshare giants are competing head to head to move into the health care space. Both Uber and Lyft have hired health care executives in an effort to become leaders in health care transportation services, providing reliable and comfortable transportation for patients.  Read More

•  The placenta has long been deemed an afterthought but more and more, scientists are viewing this ephemeral organ as critical to understanding the health and course of pregnancy. The placenta is the missing link between complications during pregnancy and development of the fetal brain.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, MIPS registry, and care navigation software.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  In the wake of a growing trend where parents opt to not vaccinate their children, reported cases of measles worldwide have been on the rise. Measles, a highly contagious scourge, had been nearly eradicated in many parts of the world just a few year ago. However, due to under- or unimmunized children in recent years, measles outbreaks are increasing in places like the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean region, and Europe. At least 95 percent of a population must have immunity to control the spread of measles, according to public health officials.  Read More

•  Lyft, a ride sharing application, has announced the hiring of its first ever VP of Health Care.  Lyft has been focusing its efforts on reducing the health care transportation gap for patients and addressing some of the social determinants that cause care disparities.  Read More

•  The number of children in the U.S. who don't have health insurance is increasing, according to a report released on Thursday by Georgetown University. Advocates for children's health blame the current administration's policies on enrollment health plans for this rise. The uninsured rate for children rose by 276,000 in 2017.  Read More

•  In response to the ever-growing sentiment that physicians are becoming bogged down by EHRs, the federal government drafted a new strategy that details goals to reduce clinician burden surrounding their interaction with EHRs and improve EHR ease of use, while still meeting regulatory requirements.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, MIPS registry, and care navigation software.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  For over a decade, hospitals across the U.S. have been merging at a rapid pace. Hospitals argue that consolidation benefits patients because of cheaper prices from coordinated services. However, in a recent analysis, mergers have been shown to actually cause an increase in prices on average hospital stays.  Read More

•  The Department of Health and Human Services is looking to remove regulatory barriers to sharing health information and recently passed the HIPAA request for information (RFI) on to the Office of Management and Budget. This is a big step in HIPAA reform as electronic data-sharing is becoming more the norm in health care.  Read More

•  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has received at least 252 cases of acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM. This polio-like disease has affected a number of children between the ages of 2 and 8. The illness starts with a fever and, in some cases, progresses to paralysis.  Read More

•  In March, Uber launched a HIPAA-compliant health platform that allows providers to schedule rides for patients.  Now, Uber is seeking supporters within the industry to help expand its reach and help address access gaps for patients with limited transportation means and no cell phone.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, MIPS registry, and care navigation software.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS) proposed a new rule on Thursday that gives states more control over setting rates for capitated payments as well as providing a three-year transition period to shift from fee-for-service to managed care. The proposed reform would allow states to include access to telehealth providers and define what qualifies as a "specialist" in determining network adequacy standards.  Read More

•  Respondents to new research are skeptical about the role electronic health records (EHRs) will play in precision medicine, saying in a recent report that precision medicine may be too complex for EHRs. Hospitals all over the world are embarking on precision medicine work, even if EHR vendors are not poised to dominate the realm.  Read More

•  In recent experiments, mice genetically modified to develop symptoms like those of Alzheimer's were given a synthetic form of THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, a substance found in marijuana, over a six week period. These mice performed as well as healthy mice on a memory test. Mice given placebos instead of THC exhibited signs of memory loss.  Read More

•  How much do you remember from this week's health care news? Take the weekly health quiz to find out!  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, MIPS registry, and care navigation software.





pMD is a small company, and we often say that we wear a lot of hats. Even so, I’m often on the receiving end of an eyebrow raised in surprise when I tell my friends outside of pMD that I oversee employee onboarding.

“Isn’t customer success your job?” “Isn’t employee onboarding part of a whole different department?” “Do you want to put that beer down?”

My answers, in order: yes, no (but please don’t ask me to help file your I-9), and definitely not.

Customer success is indeed my job. I make sure that our customers have the best possible experience with pMD, from implementation to training to ongoing support. This is exactly why I am so involved in employee onboarding. All of us at pMD, from operations coordinators to senior software engineers, interact with our customers on a daily basis, so it’s extremely important that new folks start to practice customer interactions early and often.

Helping our clients in a support and training capacity is one of the first ways that our new employees start contributing at pMD. They spend their first few weeks at pMD in “bootcamp,” learning the fundamentals of how to be a “pMD-er.” So, what makes a good pMDer?

1) Understand what pMD does and why we do it. Some of our new employees come to us with a background in health care, while many others do not. A big part of getting up to pMD speed is learning not only about our specific products, but the current state of health care in the United States, and most importantly, pMD’s mission to improve health care and save lives.

2) Be willing to work hard and go above and beyond for our customers. pMD is so proud of our unparalleled customer service, and it’s imperative for that part of our culture to get passed down to every new person that joins our team. After any interaction with a pMD employee, we want a customer to feel not only that their question was fully answered, but that their day is at least slightly improved after speaking with one of us.

3) Master the basics. Each employee has a long road of continuous professional development ahead of them, but with the help of their mentor, by the time they graduate from bootcamp, they will be proficient in giving top-notch software trainings to new users, providing the best customer service experience to our existing clients, and ready to hit the road for their next on-site implementation! (Pro-tip: dry clean your suit before each trip.)

Most of our employee onboarding process (aside from all that pesky paperwork) is focused on industry knowledge and pMD product knowledge, all with the goal that our newest hires can successfully jump right into pMD life as soon as they graduate from newbie to contributor. The way I see it, employee success equals customer success: two birds, one stone.

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.






Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Amazon Web Services (AWS) is working with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to leverage cloud technology in order to make big biomedical datasets more easily accessible in health care and and for researchers. AWS is joined by Google Cloud and others for NIH's STRIDES Initiative, or Science and Technology Research Infrastructure for Discovery, Experimentation, and Sustainability.  Read More

•  On Thursday, the government announced a new payment model that would more closely align Medicare Part B drug costs with prices of the same drug in other countries. This new payment model, called the International Pricing Index (IPI), is projected to save Medicare over $17 billion over a five-year pilot.  Read More

•  You've heard of microplastics showing up on beaches all over the world. And now, researchers have even found microplastics in samples of human waste from individuals spanning across 8 different countries. There's a concern that microplastics might be entering the blood stream, lymphatic system, and even the liver.   Read More

•  The Food and Drug Administration recently approved a new flu drug, Xofluza, which is expected to work against drug-resistant strains. The drug is not approved for young children and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention still strongly recommends that every American over six months of age get the flu shot as soon as possible.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, MIPS registry, and care navigation software.


Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Food and Drug Administration and Department of Homeland Security are teaming up to improve coordination surrounding  medical device security. This week, both entities signed a memorandum of agreement, formalizing their collaboration to improve medical cybersecurity and vulnerability disclosures.  Read More

•  Scientists at the University of Oregon studied the effects of sunlight, UV light, and darkness on bacteria found in dust inside homes around Portland. They found that rooms exposed to daylight had fewer germs because UV light is known to be a good disinfectant. Florence Nightingale was ahead of her time when she advised that hospitals be designed to let daylight in.  Read More

•  Researchers at Duke piloted a virtual reality program for physical therapy and saw a significant reduction in post-surgical costs. The virtual therapist guides patients through exercises prescribed by a real physical therapist and monitors patients' performances during the exercises. Clinicians can then tailor the recovery plan to their needs.  Read More

•  Think you're all caught up on the latest health care news? Take this quiz to find out!  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, MIPS registry, clinically integrated network, and care navigation software.





At pMD, we love to promote our culture of teaching and learning, rather than singly focusing on getting the job done. It may seem obvious once discussed, but what I found lacking in past companies I've worked for is this emphasis of helping each individual build his or her own skills. From top down, pMD promotes a company culture of sharing knowledge, open communication, and career growth. We ask all our individual contributors to embrace this philosophy we call "Mentoring".

Mentoring

Mentoring is pMD's mission statement for success - both for the company as well as for each and every individual contributor. It is a fundamental driver of career growth for the entire team. Successful mentoring frees up time for the mentor to take on new and more high level items. Mentees, in turn, learn new skills and earn new ownership. This transition to having higher level responsibilities aims to allow each party to step up into another position, which will then open up space for a new hire. This process allows mentees to naturally progress as the next generation of mentors.

It Begins With Trust

Trust is a two-way street. At pMD, mentees earn trust by completing assigned tasks. Mentors earn trust by providing the necessary training and guidance for the mentee to succeed at these tasks. Tasks must start small, to minimize risk of failure, and as more trust is earned over time, additional responsibilities can be designated.

It Continues With Communication

Here at pMD, it is the responsibility of both parties to keep a line of communication open. Mentors provide clear expectations and share feedback on performance consistently, while mentees should always feel open to asking for this feedback. When something is not understood well, mentees have the responsibility to ask for more clarification. Once a mentee is ready for more challenges, they can and should feel open about communicating that. At pMD, the expectation is that both parties are proactive with communication in order for the relationship to succeed.

Our Priority

Mentoring is a mindset at pMD. It isn't a single task. It isn't a single action. With this always at the forefront of our minds, we will succeed as a company. Every single one of us here at pMD treats this as a priority and most importantly, we tackle mentoring with a positive attitude!

The idea of mentorship sounds obvious, doesn't it? It certainly does when I read it. But the fundamental difference that sets pMD apart from other companies is making it a priority. I joke with new recruits that a pMD hour is a day at another company, a pMD week is a month somewhere else, and a pMD month is like a year. I call this the "pMD rate of learning" that dwarfs all other companies. As I reflect on my own career, I'm grateful to see how much I've learned, struggled, and grew in my first two years at pMD as compared to everything I learned in almost a decade at my previous company. Want to become a part of pMD’s amazing team? Contact us at careers@pmd.com to find out more.

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.






Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The increasing rate of C-sections (or cesarean sections) is alarming to doctors and scientists across the globe. Such high rates can be attributed to an increase in elective C-sections where the procedure is done unnecessarily. The chance of death rises to at least 60 percent for moms who elect to have a C-section and in some circumstances as much as 700 percent.  Read More

•  Average Affordable Care Act plan premiums have begun to decline, according to data released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services on Thursday. Some say the decrease is a result of actions by the current administration while policy experts point to a market correction. However, there's one thing everyone is clear on: change must happen.  Read More

•  The U.S. is currently facing the largest drug epidemic in history, with opioid overdoses quadrupling over the past 20 years. Electronic Health Record (EHR) customizations are now proving to be a valuable weapon in the fight against the opioid crisis.   Read More

•  For women under 45, the risk for colorectal cancer is increased with obesity. Studies have shown that the higher a women's body mass index, the greater her risk for early onset colorectal cancer. Weight gain of 44 to 88 pounds had a 65 percent increased risk over those who gained 10 pounds of less.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, MIPS registry, clinically integrated network, and care navigation software.





Ding ding ding *rising tone*, ding ding dong *descending tone*. Anyone that has been to a conference knows and appreciates the rhythmic chime that cues conference attendees to stop indulging on extravagant conference nibbles and move onto their next sessions, where they’ll learn from speakers about the latest health care trends or newest regulations. At pMD, we joke that conference food spreads are almost like being on vacation. Whether you’re tempted by creamy queso, hummus spreads, mounds of cheese, or decadent desserts, there is always something that piques someone’s interest.

Surprisingly, pMD doesn’t exhibit at conferences just for the food (although, it is quite the added perk). Instead, we go for the exposure to new potential customers, as well as a chance to connect with our current customers. As a member of pMD’s sales team, I’ve been to several large national conferences, like the annual Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) conference, as well as many smaller specialty-specific conferences.

Specialty conferences vary from the large national conferences in quite a few ways. Because pMD works with over 30 different specialties, we do very specific preparations before a specialty conference to make sure we’re knowledgeable about how to approach those conversations. I head into the day with a much better idea of the conversations I could potentially be having with the different providers or administrators in attendance because I have a good sense of which products will be a good fit for a cardiology practice, for example. With so many specialties to work with, we have something to offer almost everyone, but it’s always helpful going into a conference being able to anticipate trending needs. We can then sort out what customizations could be helpful for a group of their type.

Earlier this year, I was at the GI Roundtable conference in Washington, D.C., which is a gastrointestinal-specific conference. From a sales perspective, I was able to prepare for this conference by honing in on which gastro groups are currently using pMD and how our current groups utilize our products. I knew that there was a good chance that each administrator or provider who came up to our booth may have similar overlapping needs. Because of this, I was able to use this information to focus on asking questions to find out if the potential lead could be a good fit for using one of pMD’s products. If there were an attendee for which I couldn’t identify a need to use pMD, I could always revert to conversing about the impressive pile of cheese nearby.

Whether it’s a large or a small specialty-specific conference, my favorite part of any conference is recognizing a familiar face or name when someone comes by the booth to say hello! I love being able to meet pMD customers that I may have previously emailed or spoken with on the phone. Meeting face-to-face is always special and also allows us to discuss how everything is going with pMD. It’s also a great opportunity to see if there are any new pMD features the group could benefit from. If you’re a current pMD customer, there’s a good chance we could be exhibiting at a conference which you’ll be attending, so stop by and say hi.

Conferences present a great opportunity for pMD to meet new groups as well as a chance to connect with our current customers and eat some great food. We’ll be exhibiting next at the CV Transforum Conference in Austin, TX on October 11th. If you’re headed to CV Transforum this week, make sure to stop by our booth, say hello, and learn more about pMD® Charge Capture™, pMD® MIPS Registry™, pMD® Free Secure Messaging™, pMD® Clinical Communication™, or pMD® Care Navigation!

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.