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Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Doctors are reimbursed for everything ranging from office visits to lab work to medical procedures. But what about the tasks that pull allocated time away from actual face-to-face visits? Data suggests that doctors are spending a significant amount of time on desktop medicine tasks. The data also highlights a reduction in time spent with patients and yet, physicians are not reimbursed for their EHR time.  Read More

•  Do you find yourself zoning out in the middle of one-on-one conversations? Do you procrastinate more often than not? There are, according to the World Health Organization, six simple questions that can reliably identify whether you have adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It's important to note that the questions should be looked at in their totality, not individually. No single question stands out as an indicator of ADHD.  Read More

•  The federal government settled on an average rate increase of 0.45% for its finalized 2018 payment rates for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans. The rate announcement gives MA organizations the incentive to develop innovative provider network arrangements, encouraging enrollees to access high-quality healthcare services.  Read More

•  A report published Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 1 in 10 pregnant women in the continental U.S. with a confirmed Zika infection had a baby with serious birth defects or brain damage. There is also more evidence that birth defects were a bigger risk in women who were infected in the first trimester of pregnancy.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Scott Eells/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) initiative to control how farmers can give antibiotics to livestock falls short in many areas.  According to the Government Accountability Office, the FDA initiative has not been collecting usage data that allows the program to know if efforts to curb the use of routine micro-doses of antibiotics, known as growth promoters, in livestock have been successful.  Read More

•  Thursday marked another blow to the GOP's efforts to pass the American Health Care Act. House Speaker Paul Ryan did not hold a floor vote as planned after President Donald Trump held meetings with conservative and moderate Republican caucuses, hoping to come to a deal. The House can lose no more than 21 votes for the bill to pass, however there's a likelihood of more than 25 members of the Freedom Caucus who plan to vote "no."  Read More

•  On Monday, an interim rule was released, delaying the expansion and implementation of major bundled payment initiatives. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services say the additional three-month delay will allow the agency more time to review and modify the policy, if necessary. The delay also calls into question whether the new White House Administration is committed to the programs.  Read More

•  Oral health has never been a priority with the aging population. One reason? Medicare does not provide dental care, except for certain medical conditions, and California's Medicaid only covers some services. However, the effort to bring more dental care to older adults is advancing across the nation. New clinics and technologies are popping up to help improve oral health for the aging, such as an app that tracks dentures, which frequently disappear in nursing homes.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.

Image: Dr. Thomas Albini

Here's The Latest in Health Care:


•  Three women between the ages of 72 and 88 had lost most to all of their eyesight after participating in an unproven treatment where stem cells were injected into their eyes. The women later told doctors they thought they were participating in government-approved research after finding the study listed on a government website provided by the National Institutes of Health. Unfortunately, clinical trials do not need government approval to be listed the site.  Read More

•  In Trump's proposed health care budget, the Department of Health and Human Services should expect to see its budget slashed by more than $15 billion in 2018. The Department of Veterans Affairs, however, would see a $4.4 billion increase. The reduction takes funding away from the nation's foremost medical research agency as well as support programs for low-income individuals.  Read More

•  With the new 2017 Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) performance period underway, providers are left in the dark as to whether or not they must comply with program criteria. Providers that bill $30,000 or less in Medicare charges or give care to 100 or fewer beneficiaries are exempt from MIPS. The Medical Group Management Association is calling for immediate release of 2017 MIPS eligibility information to find out if clinicians are part of the nearly one-third that are eligible for exemption.  Read More

•  Researchers say that over-the-counter birth control pills would be safe for teens and that there is no evidence that adolescents are at greater risk from birth control pills than adult women. In fact, some of the potential negative side effects of oral contraception are less likely in younger adults, according to Krishna Upadhya, assistant professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Read More

Each Friday, Signor Goat reports the latest from the week in health care. Check back next Friday for your dose of our little medical corner of health care news. Brought to you by pMD, innovators in charge capture software.
To run a health care practice, it’s crucial to have the right information to navigate through the many government changes. So I’ve put together a MIPS For Dummies, of sorts. My goal is to give you some insight into the quickly approaching government changes to the reimbursement process. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has released some preliminary information and here is what we know.

Let’s start with the basics. What does MIPS stand for?
Monkey-Identified Petite Scoliosis. Just kidding! MIPS is the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System and it is a new value-based payment model. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) is the statute that created this new advancement of the value-based payment model.

What is MIPS?
MIPS is a new payment system outlining financial incentives (and penalties) based on the data submitted by practices, which judges the quality, outcomes, and efficiency of patient treatment. Imagine that the Value-Based Modifier Program, Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), and the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) all met and joined forces under one larger, combined program.

Who is at the mercy of MIPS?
Perhaps you, if you’re reading this blog post. But really, MIPS reporting will be required for any clinician billing for professional services under Medicare Part B. This includes all physicians, dentists, chiropractors, physician assistants, physical or speech therapists, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and hospital-based eligible providers. Providers who are in their first year of Medicare or are below the low-volume threshold may not be required to participate in MIPS.

When is MIPS currently scheduled to roll out?
January 1, 2017! This time I’m not kidding…

Finally, here are some fun facts about MIPS:
1. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is no longer accepting comments on the proposed rule - The cut off date was June 27, 2016. However, the final rule with comment period was issued on 11/4/16, and you can comment on that for only a few more days! Cut off for the comment period for this version of the rule is 12/19/16.

2. Qualifying Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM) Participants are eligible clinicians who are exempt from the MIPS model. This includes Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), Patient Centered Medical Homes, and bundled payment models.

3. CMS released a fancy new (and surprisingly helpful!) website that guides practices through how to participate in each category of MIPS.

4. To participate in the ACI portion of MIPS you will need a 2014 or 2015 Edition Certified EHR before or on January 1, 2017.

5. If you're eligible for MIPS but decide not to participate in the program, you will receive an automatic negative 4% payment adjustment on your 2018 Medicare reimbursements. (This one is a not-so-fun fact).

Now, last but not least, pMD’s web portal can produce reports reflecting valuable quality data that can be leveraged for MIPS reporting, PQRS solutions and other government changes.

#MIPTASTIC #MIPSYALL #MIPSYEAH
Finally, and as expected, the announcement medical practices have been waiting for since spring came today. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued a rule this afternoon to finalize the new ICD-10 deadline for October 1, 2015. Shortly after, CMS stated in a press release that this change “allows providers, insurance companies and others in the health care industry time to ramp up their operations to ensure their systems and business processes are ready to go on Oct. 1, 2015.”

The deadline was pushed back on March 31 of this year when the U.S. Senate voted on legislation that included a one-year delay to ICD-10. This delay came as a relief to many medical practices that required additional time and resources to implement an effective ICD-10 plan by the mandatory transition date. Even with the one year extension now formally in effect, medical practices are continuing to press on with their ICD-10 implementation strategies. With a good mobile charge capture system in place the ICD-10 transition is smoother and easier, making the countdown to the new disease classification system less daunting.

Marilyn Tanner, Administrator of CMS, contends that the "ICD-10 codes will provide better support for patient care, and improve disease management, quality measurement and analytics.”

Source: CMS.gov