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where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.

POSTS BY TAG | Customer Interaction






pMD is a small company, and we often say that we wear a lot of hats. Even so, I’m often on the receiving end of an eyebrow raised in surprise when I tell my friends outside of pMD that I oversee employee onboarding.

“Isn’t customer success your job?” “Isn’t employee onboarding part of a whole different department?” “Do you want to put that beer down?”

My answers, in order: yes, no (but please don’t ask me to help file your I-9), and definitely not.

Customer success is indeed my job. I make sure that our customers have the best possible experience with pMD, from implementation to training to ongoing support. This is exactly why I am so involved in employee onboarding. All of us at pMD, from operations coordinators to senior software engineers, interact with our customers on a daily basis, so it’s extremely important that new folks start to practice customer interactions early and often.

Helping our clients in a support and training capacity is one of the first ways that our new employees start contributing at pMD. They spend their first few weeks at pMD in “bootcamp,” learning the fundamentals of how to be a “pMD-er.” So, what makes a good pMDer?

1) Understand what pMD does and why we do it. Some of our new employees come to us with a background in health care, while many others do not. A big part of getting up to pMD speed is learning not only about our specific products, but the current state of health care in the United States, and most importantly, pMD’s mission to improve health care and save lives.

2) Be willing to work hard and go above and beyond for our customers. pMD is so proud of our unparalleled customer service, and it’s imperative for that part of our culture to get passed down to every new person that joins our team. After any interaction with a pMD employee, we want a customer to feel not only that their question was fully answered, but that their day is at least slightly improved after speaking with one of us.

3) Master the basics. Each employee has a long road of continuous professional development ahead of them, but with the help of their mentor, by the time they graduate from bootcamp, they will be proficient in giving top-notch software trainings to new users, providing the best customer service experience to our existing clients, and ready to hit the road for their next on-site implementation! (Pro-tip: dry clean your suit before each trip.)

Most of our employee onboarding process (aside from all that pesky paperwork) is focused on industry knowledge and pMD product knowledge, all with the goal that our newest hires can successfully jump right into pMD life as soon as they graduate from newbie to contributor. The way I see it, employee success equals customer success: two birds, one stone.

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.









Ding ding ding *rising tone*, ding ding dong *descending tone*. Anyone that has been to a conference knows and appreciates the rhythmic chime that cues conference attendees to stop indulging on extravagant conference nibbles and move onto their next sessions, where they’ll learn from speakers about the latest health care trends or newest regulations. At pMD, we joke that conference food spreads are almost like being on vacation. Whether you’re tempted by creamy queso, hummus spreads, mounds of cheese, or decadent desserts, there is always something that piques someone’s interest.

Surprisingly, pMD doesn’t exhibit at conferences just for the food (although, it is quite the added perk). Instead, we go for the exposure to new potential customers, as well as a chance to connect with our current customers. As a member of pMD’s sales team, I’ve been to several large national conferences, like the annual Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) conference, as well as many smaller specialty-specific conferences.

Specialty conferences vary from the large national conferences in quite a few ways. Because pMD works with over 30 different specialties, we do very specific preparations before a specialty conference to make sure we’re knowledgeable about how to approach those conversations. I head into the day with a much better idea of the conversations I could potentially be having with the different providers or administrators in attendance because I have a good sense of which products will be a good fit for a cardiology practice, for example. With so many specialties to work with, we have something to offer almost everyone, but it’s always helpful going into a conference being able to anticipate trending needs. We can then sort out what customizations could be helpful for a group of their type.

Earlier this year, I was at the GI Roundtable conference in Washington, D.C., which is a gastrointestinal-specific conference. From a sales perspective, I was able to prepare for this conference by honing in on which gastro groups are currently using pMD and how our current groups utilize our products. I knew that there was a good chance that each administrator or provider who came up to our booth may have similar overlapping needs. Because of this, I was able to use this information to focus on asking questions to find out if the potential lead could be a good fit for using one of pMD’s products. If there were an attendee for which I couldn’t identify a need to use pMD, I could always revert to conversing about the impressive pile of cheese nearby.

Whether it’s a large or a small specialty-specific conference, my favorite part of any conference is recognizing a familiar face or name when someone comes by the booth to say hello! I love being able to meet pMD customers that I may have previously emailed or spoken with on the phone. Meeting face-to-face is always special and also allows us to discuss how everything is going with pMD. It’s also a great opportunity to see if there are any new pMD features the group could benefit from. If you’re a current pMD customer, there’s a good chance we could be exhibiting at a conference which you’ll be attending, so stop by and say hi.

Conferences present a great opportunity for pMD to meet new groups as well as a chance to connect with our current customers and eat some great food. We’ll be exhibiting next at the CV Transforum Conference in Austin, TX on October 11th. If you’re headed to CV Transforum this week, make sure to stop by our booth, say hello, and learn more about pMD® Charge Capture™, pMD® MIPS Registry™, pMD® Free Secure Messaging™, pMD® Clinical Communication™, or pMD® Care Navigation!

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.




After a short night’s sleep, Anthony and I took a quick detour on our way to the airport to see Nebraska’s capitol, the second tallest state capitol in the country (Louisiana’s comes in first). We were impressed with the classical style and the crowning statue, The Sower, a tribute to agriculture. But we were even more impressed with what $10,000,000 could buy you in the 1920s and 1930s… or Nebraska.

A few minutes later, we were back at the airport. Rental car accommodations are one of the most convenient parts of private air travel, and we were able to leave our rental car a few paces from the plane. We were ‘wheels up’ and on our way to Jackson, Mich. moments after that.

In Jackson, Anthony and I had lunch with Don Knox, a long time pMD charge capture customer. Don is the administrator of pMD’s very first pulmonary group, and his support has helped pulmonary to become one of our top specialties. I have worked with Don over email and phone, and it was really fun to meet him in person. Although his group is still in private practice, he has seen a lot of changes with hospitals acquiring practices, and he had some really interesting insights on some of the government changes in health care.

We reviewed pMD Messaging with Don to prepare for his upcoming messaging implementation, and we were able to check in with a couple of his providers. Everyone at the group was happy, and one of the doctors joked that although he found pMD easy to use, his wife would laugh out loud if anyone ever referred to him as tech savvy. We train doctors of all ages and all technical aptitudes, and this is what we love to hear.

From Jackson, we went on to West Chester, Ohio to meet with a pMD group that we implemented charge capture with a couple of years ago. It was a special treat to fly into West Chester since Anthony and I have both had memorably difficult trips flying into Cincinnati on commercial airlines. (I missed my connecting flight and had to wait three hours for the next flight. Anthony had to take car service for the hour long drive to West Chester, which takes you through some back roads reminiscent of Children of the Corn.)

It was good to see Ahmad Alkhaled and Tariq Sharif at Medical Administrative Group, a hospitalist group and billing company in West Chester. They had some great feedback for us on how to improve their charge capture workflow for seeing duplicate billing charges, and Anthony walked them through pMD Messaging and our ICD-10 conversion. They said that they were happy, which made us happy.

We made the hour long drive back to Cincinnati for the night to stay close to our early morning meeting on Thursday. We ate at the trendy Senate pub in downtown Cincinnati, which has been revitalized to its original charm before going back to the hotel for a late night with our laptops and inboxes.

 

Lincoln, Neb. State Capitol. The dome is designed to reflect the weather and The Sower is casting the seeds of life to the wind at the top. We caught some.


Jackson, Mich. The Pulmonary Clinics of Southern Michigan office has a fun, nautical theme. They were the first pulmonary group that pMD ever welcomed aboard.
If you ask any pMDer what their favorite part of their job is, he or she will tell you that it’s the customer interaction. We thrive on making doctors happy. It’s what makes our charge capture and messaging product great. It’s what gives us professional and personal satisfaction. And it’s why we are all motivated to go above and beyond for our customers.

We have customers all over the country, and one of our biggest challenges is managing our lives in San Francisco and getting quality time with our new and existing customers. In order to maximize our time with our customers and minimize our time negotiating security lines and long layovers and missed connections, we share access to a small, private plane.

My colleague Anthony Tsang and I are on our first big trip on the plane this week. We’re equally nervous about not having access to a restroom at 30,000 feet and our itinerary. We are planning to cross through eight different states to visit five different pMD groups in the harder-to-reach corners of the Midwest.

After a big night out with our entire team and their significant others on Monday night, Anthony and I started our journey late Tuesday morning. We left from San Rafael, Calif. and flew to St. John, Ariz. - current home to reasonably priced jet fuel and 30 mph winds. After a white-knuckle landing, a review of our inboxes, and surprisingly delicious burritos, we headed out to Lincoln, Neb.

I am working with a sales lead in Nebraska (they weren’t able to meet when we were passing through, but we hope to see them in their beautiful state soon!), and it was really fun to see the state’s capital city. Travel is important, and it’s easier to relate to people when you can picture their home.

My Wikipedia search told me that Lincoln was #1 on the Gallup-Healthways list of "Happiest & Healthiest" cities. We landed with high expectations, and the city didn’t disappoint us. We enjoyed the green pastures, Omaha steaks, and a microbrew before heading to our hotel to confirm our agenda for Wednesday: a lunch meeting in Jackson, Mich. and a meeting in West Chester, Ohio.

St. John, Ariz. The dried creek beds were beautiful and made me thirsty.


Lincoln, Neb. The lushness and trees surrounding the creeks were a stark contrast to Arizona. The devastating double tornado that hit Nebraska on Monday was just 100 miles north.


The guy at the airport, a.k.a. our first native Lincolnian that we came into contact with, told us that the biggest thing to do in Lincoln was to tailgate. He said that we were out of luck visiting outside of football season. We were in luck to find this tailgate warning sign at our hotel parking garage that confirmed that tailgating is a real sport.