The pMD Blog

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pMD Blog...

where we cover interesting and relevant news, insights, events, and more related to the health care industry and pMD. Most importantly, this blog is a fun, engaging way to learn about developments in an ever-changing field that is heavily influenced by technology.

POSTS BY TAG | customer support


"Love without conversation is impossible." This quote by American philosopher, Mortimer Adler, embodies a fundamental pillar of pMD design - something we'll call "love injection." Ever since the beginning, building software that is as intuitive as it is useful has been a core component of pMD product development. My previous post highlights empathy as the first and most important step of our design process and this post will focus on the upsides of a love injection and how it plays a part in our empathic design process. Love injection is our design team's internal call-to-action whenever our users encounter a scenario that leaves them feeling lost and unloved. Learning how we used it to overcome our missteps in product design will hopefully encourage your health care design team to leverage even more conversations with customers in the future.

The Backstory


Back in the early days of pMD telehealth we had far fewer patients on the platform. Then COVID-19 spread, and everyone was sent home, told to stay there, and attend medical appointments remotely. In the span of a couple of weeks, we suddenly had over 36,000 new patients using pMD for video calls. The deluge of new patient users - many of whom had never used telehealth services before - increased the customer support volume to unexpected levels. Questions we may have previously seen a few times over the course of a week resurfaced several times an hour: "What do I need enabled on my phone to have a video call?", "When will the doctor call me?", "What do I do now?", "I have a question for my practice...", etc. 

Immediate steps were taken by our customer success team to create more patient-facing documentation, so our new patient users could feel comfortable using pMD. These updates drastically improved our team’s response to patients, but we knew more had to be done to reduce the reliance on documentation alone while maintaining scalability. This became the catalyst for a new round of updates from the design team to make the user experience as intuitive as possible. Prior to COVID-19, we had been focused on telehealth through the health care provider lens and now it was time to revisit telehealth strictly from the patient's perspective. 

A Solution


To design effectively for patients, we revisited our design thinking process and focused again on empathy and designing with love. I'm referring to the three "laws of love”:

1. Love starts with what you know - build familiarity into the design.
2. Love makes complicated choices simple - one choice means no wrong choice.
3. Love is spontaneous! - Make it fun; make it rewarding!

Instead of a traditional user research study, I embraced Adler's quote and joined the support team in fielding phone calls from patients. Effectively, I became tech support for several hours every day. Assisting the customer support team opened my eyes to critical areas for improvement, namely around the onboarding experience for patients. One missing link was to ensure patients enabled all the proper app permissions whilst reassuring those that had properly enabled permissions, that they didn't have to do anything else until the doctor called at the scheduled time. 

As I answered patient questions and took notes, I thought about what I would like one of my own family members to see when setting up pMD. From start to finish, the pMD design team ultimately came up with an onboarding experience that we would feel comfortable having our grandparents use - that’s when we knew we had succeeded in injecting more love into the product experience. A week after the new onboarding update was released, the number of support inquiries related to app setup and onboarding before they started their first appointment decreased significantly despite a steady increase in new patient users!

Improving communication amongst the medical care team has long been a focus for pMD. This experience has shown us that we can never pause for a moment from speaking directly with our customers (both providers and patients alike) and showing them some love! I encourage you to open up more conversations with your customers - even temporarily hop in the trenches with your customer support team - and learn how you can give your product a proper “love injection.”

To find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our charge capture and MIPS registrysecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.


Customer interactions article


Don't trust a mirror that only tells you how wonderful you look.” ― Matshona Dhliwayo

I remember playing softball as a kid, obsessively working on my swing. It’s all about your stance, the way you hold the bat, and timing. I would practice and swing the bat one hundred times over, but what I always needed was another perspective, someone to watch and tell me what I could fix.

As someone who has worked in customer service for the last few years, I’ve learned first-hand how customer interactions can serve as an outside perspective that companies need.

Product Support as a Primary Customer Interaction Channel

pMD’s customer support is one of the primary channels in which we interact with our customers. Not only do we provide 24/7/365 support to help solve any issue or answer any questions pMD customers might encounter, it’s also a way to gauge how our products are creating value and what things we need to focus on as a company to make pMD even better!

Product Feedback Process

Here at pMD we “eat our own dog food,” meaning we use our own product on a daily basis (we don’t actually eat dog food). This gives us pretty good insight into what is, and sometimes isn’t, working properly. Even with that said, hearing from our customers who use pMD in their medical practices allows us to gain further insight into areas of improvement and innovation. The pieces of feedback they give us are like little nuggets of gold for debugging, making adjustments, and enhancing product features. We have a process for receiving this feedback and doing our best to ensure nothing is overlooked or falls through the cracks:

1) First, product feedback is received by a pMD employee via various channels of interaction with our customers, such as support, training, implementation, or account management

2) The request or idea is submitted as a ticket to our product team for review.

3) The product feedback request is triaged based on answers to the following questions:

•  How immediately can change be implemented?

•  How many users will be positively impacted?

•  How much time will this save our users?

•  Will this improve our security?

•  Does the update make our products easier to use?

Charge Capture Product Feedback in Action: New Feature for Nephrology Billing Teams

Most new product features and updates that we release are driven by the feedback we get from our customers. If the request identifies a specific need and the solution will positively impact pMD’s user base, then the request has a good chance of making it on to our product roadmap.

We recently released a new feature that helps our charge capture customers' nephrology billing teams stay organized and save time by automatically batching Monthly Capitation Payment (MCP) dialysis visits, where they can then be appropriately processed at the end of the month. This enhancement was a direct result of customer feedback; through various account management meetings and support encounters, we learned that many nephrology billing teams were spending a disproportionate amount of time manually sorting and organizing their monthly dialysis visits. We worked with these customers to understand the issue at hand and determine how to best implement a change that would be most impactful, ultimately resulting in a new feature now available to all of our nephrology practices.

To put it simply, the relationship we have with our customers is symbiotic. We strive to make a product that creates value for our customers, and in return, we truly value the feedback that we receive from them. While it's great to have a mirror that tells us how wonderful we look most of the time, we also appreciate when we receive feedback on how we could be better!

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.





pMD is a small company, and we often say that we wear a lot of hats. Even so, I’m often on the receiving end of an eyebrow raised in surprise when I tell my friends outside of pMD that I oversee employee onboarding.

“Isn’t customer success your job?” “Isn’t employee onboarding part of a whole different department?” “Do you want to put that beer down?”

My answers, in order: yes, no (but please don’t ask me to help file your I-9), and definitely not.

Customer success is indeed my job. I make sure that our customers have the best possible experience with pMD, from implementation to training to ongoing support. This is exactly why I am so involved in employee onboarding. All of us at pMD, from operations coordinators to senior software engineers, interact with our customers on a daily basis, so it’s extremely important that new folks start to practice customer interactions early and often.

Helping our clients in a support and training capacity is one of the first ways that our new employees start contributing at pMD. They spend their first few weeks at pMD in “bootcamp,” learning the fundamentals of how to be a “pMD-er.” So, what makes a good pMDer?

1) Understand what pMD does and why we do it. Some of our new employees come to us with a background in health care, while many others do not. A big part of getting up to pMD speed is learning not only about our specific products, but the current state of health care in the United States, and most importantly, pMD’s mission to improve health care and save lives.

2) Be willing to work hard and go above and beyond for our customers. pMD is so proud of our unparalleled customer service, and it’s imperative for that part of our culture to get passed down to every new person that joins our team. After any interaction with a pMD employee, we want a customer to feel not only that their question was fully answered, but that their day is at least slightly improved after speaking with one of us.

3) Master the basics. Each employee has a long road of continuous professional development ahead of them, but with the help of their mentor, by the time they graduate from bootcamp, they will be proficient in giving top-notch software trainings to new users, providing the best customer service experience to our existing clients, and ready to hit the road for their next on-site implementation! (Pro-tip: dry clean your suit before each trip.)

Most of our employee onboarding process (aside from all that pesky paperwork) is focused on industry knowledge and pMD product knowledge, all with the goal that our newest hires can successfully jump right into pMD life as soon as they graduate from newbie to contributor. The way I see it, employee success equals customer success: two birds, one stone.

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.