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POSTS BY TAG | Mobile Charge Capture



instant (adjective): produced or occurring with or as if with extreme rapidity and ease

Instant replay, instant gratification, instant message, instant... oatmeal? Sometimes, when you want something done, you want it done now! Time is a valuable resource, especially for busy medical professionals who are constantly trying to whittle down their to-do list so they can focus on the most important thing - caring for patients!

Doctors have used pMD® Charge Capture™ for decades to save time and get paid faster. Here at pMD, though, the work never stops! Feedback from our user base, in conjunction with our own observations, prompted the question: could we make an already fast and easy process (mobile charge capture) even faster and even easier?

Because we have amazing software engineering and design teams, the answer to that question was happily YES! Mobile charge capture, meet Instant Capture™.

When a doctor or medical provider sees a patient in the hospital for a new admission or a new consult, there’s a lot to initially record, such as the patient’s basic information, the reason for their hospital visit, the physician who referred them, and the initial level of care they received. The doctor performing this consult needs to record all this information in order to get paid for the work she does.

Many patients then go on to stay in the hospital for a few more days for additional treatment and follow-up. It’s common that a patient’s demographic information, medical diagnoses, and referring physician would remain the same for the entirety of their hospital stay. So, while our consulting doctor may subsequently see this patient several more times, there’s no need for her to enter all this information each day. The only thing she needs to update each time she visits her patient is the date and level of care provided.

Our engineering team honed in on an idea to make capturing those follow-up visits in pMD even faster. If a provider sees a patient for a routine, subsequent encounter in which nothing medically has changed from the previous day, how could we make the recording of that visit even faster?

Our new Instant Capture™ feature allows providers to press and hold on a patient’s name from their census list and capture a follow-up charge right from the favorites menu that pops up. One screen, one action, one second - that sounds pretty instant to me! Providers using this feature can complete their daily charge capture in far less time than it takes to make a bowl of instant oatmeal. (Quaker, please take note of the definition of instant - that bowl of oatmeal is still taking a solid two minutes out of my morning.)

We’re so excited to release this update to all providers using pMD® Charge Capture™, saving them additional precious seconds each day. Go forth and capture!

 

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registrycharge capturesecure messagingclinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.



I actually had to go in for a colonoscopy the other day. The next day when I got home from work, my wife said, "The doctor called with your colonoscopy results. Good news - they found your head.”

All jokes aside, in advance of pMD’s attendance at the upcoming GI Outlook conference hosted by ASGE (American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy) this week, we want to share a little more than just GI-related humor. If your gastroenterology practice is interested in improving efficiencies and ultimately patient care, you have come to the right place!

Our mobile charge capture and advanced rounding tools enable providers to easily capture and submit hospital charges in real-time, reducing charge lag from weeks to less than a day. In fact, gastroenterology groups using pMD have reduced their charge lag from 14 days to just 0.2 days

Our custom suite of powerful, efficient, and intuitive technology allows health care teams to communicate and capture data at the point of care, improving accuracy and ROI. 

For example, an average 50-provider practice can realize close to $400K per year in additional revenue by implementing a proactive process around transitions of care. pMD’s automated discharge alerts and scheduling instructions make managing this process a breeze, helping grow outpatient practices in the process. With the help of our robust analytics dashboard, practices can easily follow up with patients, reduce readmissions, and recognize Transitional Care Management (TCM) revenue.

Ultimately, it all comes down to streamlining physician workflows. When providers and staff are equipped with the right tools to enhance productivity and increase collaboration for rounding and hand-offs, consult notifications, billing and secure communication, they can spend less time worrying about processes and more time caring for patients. 

But don’t just take our word for it:
"The most common question I am asked about pMD has nothing to do with its use; my doctors and staff want to know why we didn't get pMD years ago. Hospital billing lag time and lost charges have all but been eliminated. The secure messaging feature works great on both provider cell phones and staff desktops. We had high hopes that pMD might improve our operations...seamless integration with existing systems and workflows, better secure messaging, and a reduction in lost charges and billing lag time. pMD has surpassed these high hopes and become one of the best investments made in my 25-plus years of managing medical practices."

- Lucien Roberts, Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc., Virginia

"The doctors love it, we love it! We are much more efficient with pMD. We're able to track charges better, and bridge the gap of missing charges. It's easier to maintain over paper and has made our process so much easier. pMD has helped us reduce charge lag by at least 75 percent. We also love the ability to message within a particular patient record. It helps our messaging organization, and allows for faster messaging overall by not having to retype patient information into the message. Everyone references the correct patient immediately and as a result, responses come much faster.”

Tamra Crespo, Coding Compliance Team Lead, Austin Gastro, Texas

We will be exhibiting at the GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference in the Loews Hollywood Hotel, August 2 - 4. Come stop by booth #4 for a demo! 

All groups are different, which is why we provide all customers with a full workflow analysis and unlimited consultation services. We’ll continue to work with your practice until you see tangible improvements to the key metrics that matter most to you!

For more information click here or contact us directly.

Find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, and care navigation software and services, please contact pMD.





New research has found that Electronic Health Records don’t reduce the administrative costs of medical billing. In a large academic health care system with a certified EHR, “costs for processing a single bill ranged from $20 for a primary care visit to $215 for an inpatient surgical procedure, or up to 25 percent of revenue.” That’s a staggering drain on the bottom line.

Worse yet, the researchers did not find any obvious process issues within the institution’s central billing office that could be streamlined. They said that “the high costs were not caused by wasteful, inefficient processes, duplicate or redundant tasks, or the inappropriate use of high-wage personnel to perform low-skilled tasks.” So what gives?

One factor to consider is the quality and the timeliness of the information that reaches the central billing office. If the institution is relying on EHR software to capture billing information as part of the patient’s progress note or op report, then it may take days or weeks for the physician to finalize and sign that note. Additionally, it may be missing information that is needed for billing. For example, it may have the patient’s complete problem list, but a coder may be required to determine which specific ICD-10 diagnoses this physician was addressing during their visit on this date of service. Charge entry lag and requiring coders to look at every charge would both contribute to billing overhead that can’t be streamlined away on the back end. In other words: garbage in, garbage out.

This is where mobile charge capture software is like delicious revenue peanut butter that complements the EHR’s clinical chocolate. It can get complete and accurate billing information to the central billing office in less than a day, regardless of how long the EHR progress note takes to complete. And that charge already has just the ICD-10 and charge codes that are specific to the physician’s specialty and to the date of service. The charge even acts as a “ticket” to find missing notes and thus lost revenue.

Desktop EHRs were never meant to be mobile charge capture systems, and they don’t reduce the cost of billing for medical services. And it’s expensive to try to patch up and work around issues with charge lag and coding, especially when those originate on the front end, with getting accurately and timely information to the central billing office. Fortunately, pMD Charge Capture and MIPS Registry solves this problem at its origin and results in a much faster and less expensive billing process.

 If you'd like to find out more about pMD's suite of products, which includes our MIPS registry, charge capture, secure messaging, clinical communication, care navigation, and clinically integrated network software and services, please contact pMD.



From a financial perspective, one of the benefits of mobile charge capture software is a tremendous reduction in charge entry lag. This is the length of the time between when the patient is seen and when the charge is captured electronically - not on a piece of paper where it could be misplaced or accidentally used as a napkin.

Providers who see patients in an office or clinic setting typically have low charge entry lag. Patients come to them and the provider is always in front of a computer, so they can capture billing information at the same time as they're doing other documentation.

Everything changes the moment the provider heads over to see patients at an outside facility such as a hospital or nursing home. Suddenly they are walking from room to room, and they need to improvise a system (typically a paper system) to track what happens as they go along - or they have to reconstruct it from memory later, when they're in front of a computer. Then they have to figure out how get the paper or spreadsheet back to their billing office. This administrative burden can create a cycle of procrastination that leads to weeks of charge entry lag as busy providers struggle to stay on top of their paperwork.

The statistics tell the story. If you're looking for a mobile charge capture solution, you should ask each vendor what their median charge lag is across their entire customer base for these places of service: Hospital Inpatient, Hospital Outpatient / Surgical Center, and Skilled Nursing Facility. If a vendor tracks these statistics, the answers may reveal whether their charge capture solution is usable in real time. If they don't track these statistics, why not? Charge entry lag is one of the key metrics for charge capture software, and you should choose a vendor that helps its customers measure and improve it.

In February 2017, the median (typical) pMD customer had a charge entry lag of 0.06 days at these remote facilities. In fact, 84.9 percent of pMD’s customers had a charge entry lag of less than one day outside of the clinic setting. Of providers who used pMD to capture charges in February, 90.8 percent used the pMD mobile app to do so, and 91.2 percent of all February charges were created on mobile. These numbers prove that practices are living the dream of real-time mobile charge capture. The fast, intuitive mobile app that works offline is key to achieving this.

What does all this mean for a medical practice? If you start out with a charge entry lag of one week at your remote facilities, and you become a typical pMD customer with a charge entry lag of less than one day, then you immediately recover a full week of revenue that had been floating out there somewhere in paper form. You could bill 372 days worth of revenue in a single calendar year of 365 days.

iOS 8, Apple’s newest operating system to be released with the iPhone 6 this fall, contains some exciting and unprecedented features in the password department. With the introduction of iOS 7 and the iPhone 5S, we oohed and awed over the TouchID password feature. We no longer had to enter in a 4+ digit pin every time to keep our iPhones secure - the phone simply scanned our thumbprint and verified our identity. Pretty innovative technology.

Now, Apple will take TouchID to the next level with iOS 8 extensions and could allow third-party applications, like pMD, to take advantage of this powerful feature. What does this mean for health care providers who are increasingly using their iPhones in their work? For one thing, it’ll help cut down on their extensive list of passwords to remember for both work and personal applications. We hear from our doctors using mobile charge capture about the constant hassle of keeping track of numerous passwords among their various health care systems and the time spent having to retrieve forgotten passwords. It’s even common for some systems to require a password change every couple of months! The iOS 8 password features will also be a huge benefit for health care companies who are developing mobile software faster than you can remember your EHR password.

If iOS 8 can simplify the password process and make them even more secure, then that’s a win for both doctors and health care software companies alike.

Source: The Verge
As of last week, we released version 8 of pMD’s iOS charge capture application, which fully supports secure text messaging between providers and staff in and between practices. One of the inherent challenges in mobile development is trying to keep your user base up to date with the newest version of your app. Not only does this ensure that users get the latest features and performance improvements, it also helps keep the organization agile by not having to support and maintain backward compatibility with legacy versions. With fewer strings attached to the past, a small team of developers can deliver above their weight class.

Like many companies that support native applications on mobile devices, we always struggled with getting enough of our users to upgrade to the latest version in a timely manner. Last year, Apple helped alleviate this problem by introducing auto-update to applications. In the first few days after the update, there was an inevitable spike in upgrades, followed by a linear-like rate. A little more than a week after its release, over 58 percent of our user base is now updated to the latest version of the app, which is a much faster adoption rate than we had for previous versions.


There are several reasons, however, why this number isn’t higher: some users have auto-update turned off, haven’t used pMD since the app updated, are prevented from updating the app due to not yet having iOS 7+, or are simply afraid of change. So even though the problem of legacy app support is improving, it is by no means solved. There really won’t be a silver bullet other than customer education and building updates that persuade the most skeptical hold outs that an update is worth while.
Transitioning to the new ICD-10 code set without a mobile charge capture strategy is like traversing a snowstorm without a shovel. You will get through it (eventually), but it won’t be easy.

With the ICD-10 transition looming later this year, practices are scrambling to get a plan into place. Mobile charge capture can be an important part of that transition for doctors who see patients in hospitals and other locations outside of their office.

When providers are in the clinic environment, there are practice management and medical billing services to keep them organized and efficient with charge entry. But when providers work outside of their office’s four walls to see patients, they often revert to disorganized and inefficient systems of paper, spreadsheets, phone calls, and text messages… napkins, even. Mobile charge capture replaces these systems with intuitive software. It extends the practice to the hospital and the hospital back to the practice, so providers can stay on top of everything in real-time and communicate efficiently from their smartphones and tablets.

It might seem easier to ignore the snowstorm of ICD-10. But addressing your needs now by applying a good mobile charge capture strategy will make the transition smoother and easier.

Read the full article about how mobile charge capture can feel like a day at the beach with your transition to billing with ICD-10: http://www.athenahealth.com/blog/2014/01/29/icd-10-transition-the-benefits-of-a-mobile-charge-capture-strategy/
In my last post, I painted a picture of a war between Apple and Google for the brains of our mobile devices. Some inquisitive readers, however, wondered why I didn't mention anything about another well-known contender, BlackBerry. (No one asked about Windows.) The answer shouldn't be surprising for anyone following the news. As of last month, BlackBerry had just 0.6 percent of the market (http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/blackberrys-market-share-falls-below-others/). Similarly, for the pMD charge capture app, BlackBerry accounts for only 0.7 percent of mobile users.
mobile-market-share-chart copy

Looking at the last few years of pMD users, the trend is clear.

blackberry-user-trend-chart copy

Of our current users who had BlackBerry devices, more than 92 percent switched to iOS devices, and the rest switched to Android.

The reasons why BlackBerry fell from its once-envied position will be the subject of case studies for business students for years to come. Yet it's easy to forget that we stand on the shoulders of BlackBerry. When I joined pMD as a software engineer in 2009, BlackBerry accounted for more than half of our user base. I heard firsthand from doctors and nurses how much they loved their devices, from the efficiency of their physical keyboards to their robust messaging--BlackBerry was cool. It’s easy to forget that BlackBerry was called “Crackberry,” a nickname no modern device has inherited.

Even though the fate of RIM and BlackBerry serves as a cautionary tale that nothing in technology is sacred, it is also a chance to reflect on what they made possible. In particular, here at pMD, we can reflect on how they helped make mobile charge capture and in fact mobile medicine a reality.